The Search for America’s Tiniest Turtles

In Massachusetts, a team is restoring wetlands and using some old-school ways to track bog turtles process.

Jenny Rogers

The Amargosa Vole is the World’s Cutest Litmus Test of the Human-Water Relationship

The Amargosa vole is a story of loss and rediscovery, peril and surprise.

Sophie Parker

Meet the Muskrat: Push-Up Champion of Cattail Marshes

Meet the small semi-aquatic mammal of the cattail marsh.

Lisa Ballard

The Carbon Cost of Converting Peatlands to Oil Palm

New research from Indonesia calculates the carbon cost of converting peat swamps to oil palm plantations: 640 metric tons of CO2 per hectare.

Justine E. Hausheer

Story type: TNC Science Brief

Dumpster Diving Helps Urban Wood Storks Survive

New research suggests that urban environments can act as a buffer for wetland bird species when natural food sources become unpredictable.

Justine E. Hausheer

Story type: TNC Science Brief

Better Mapping for Better Management of Gabon’s Coastal Wetlands (and Beyond)

If a picture is worth a thousand words, an accurate map may well be worth an entire novel. In Gabon, scientists are working to map a healthy future for Gabon's coastal wetlands.

Cara Cannon Byington

Story type: TNC Science Brief

Bird Country: Saving the Riverina’s Last Wild Wetlands

In a dry corner of southeast Australia, life-giving wetlands sustain a huge array of birds—and a 50,000-year old culture.

Justine E. Hausheer

Restoring Emiquon’s “Wetland of Dreams”

Restoring a large cornfield to a wetland isn’t a glimpse at the past, but a look to conservation’s future.

Matthew L. Miller

50 Fish, 50 States: The Bass of Emiquon

Chasing bass on a former cornfield turned restored wetland in Illinois.

Matthew L. Miller

Bumper-Crop Birds: Pop-Up Wetlands Are a Success in California

By partnering with rice farmers in California, the Conservancy is transforming fields into pop-up wetlands for migrant shorebirds, yielding the largest average shorebird densities ever reported for agriculture in the region.

Justine E. Hausheer

Hurricane Sandy and the Flooding That Wasn’t

Most visitors come her for the warblers, but some come for the weirs.

Cara Cannon Byington

Give Me Shelter

Our writer is in Cape May during fall migration. She could be birding, so why is she climbing around on a roof without her binoculars instead?

Cara Cannon Byington