Featured Post

The Amargosa toad. Photo: Matt Miller/TNC
Jaymee Marty's team looks into buckets of water collected from the vernal pools on the Howard Ranch near Sacramento for research into the effects of cattle grazing on California's delicate vernal pool habitats. Photo by Ian Shive.
Celebrate healthy fish runs and healthy rivers on May 24! Photo: © Ami Vitale
When predators can keep this voracious purple marsh crab in check, marsh grasses stand a better chance. Photo courtesy of Mark Bertness.
Friends and supporters gathered at a reception before the Future of Nature panel discussion on population this week.  Photo credit:  John Clarke Russ for The Nature Conservancy
More Cool Green Science from The Nature Conservancy
Connect with us to get updates. 600 scientists helping you get smart about nature.
Ash Meadows Amargosa pupfish. Photo: Scott Hein
A California Condor and it's chick. Photo by Pacific Southwest Region USFWS through a Creative Commons license.
Diana Bermudez reaches out to pet a trusting grey whale.
Starlings flying off Royal Pier, Aberystwyth, Wales. Image credit: David Daniels/Flickr through a Creative Commons license.
Mule deer at Torrey Creek Trailhead, Wind River Range Wyoming. Photo by Scott Copeland.
NatureNet Science Fellow Dan Auerbach. Photo courtesy of D. Auerbach.
The sage grouse robot, ready for action. Photo: Gail Patricelli
A Pika gathering huckleberry leaves for winter food, Elkhorn Wildlife Area. Photo by Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife through a Creative Commons license.
A red fox prowls the urban greenbelt in Boise, Idaho. Photo: Phares Book
A girl stands surrounded by water in Raboto, a slum area of Gonaives, in the Artibonite Region of Haiti, after heavy flooding hit the town in the wake of Hurricane Tomas in 2010, prompting a nationwide outbreak of cholera. Image credit: UN Photo/UNICEF/Marco Dormino/Flickr.

Forest Dilemmas

Too many deer. Logging one tree to save another. Beavers versus old growth. Welcome to forest conservation in the Anthropocene. Beginning Monday, July 21, join us for a provocative 5-part series exploring the full complexity facing forest conservation in the eastern United States.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is managed by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications, and edited by Bob Lalasz, its director of science communications. Email us your feedback.

Innovative Science

Investing in Seagrass
Marine scientists and fishers alike know that grass beds are valuable as nursery habitat. A new Conservancy-funded study puts a number to it.

Drones Aid Bird Conservation
How can California conservationists accurately count thousands of cranes? Enter a new tool in bird monitoring: the drone.

Creating a Climate-Smart Agriculture
Can farmers globally both adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change? A new paper answers with a definitive yes. But it won't be easy.

Latest Tweets from @nature_brains

Categories