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A forest planner tags trees at a reduced impact logging (RIL) concession in East Kalimanatan, Indonesia. Photo credit: © Bridget Besaw
Ptarmigans have amazing adaptations to life in the cold and snow (beyond their seasonal change of outerwear). White-tailed ptarmigan, (Lagopus leucurus), photographed at Denali National Park in Alaska. Photo credit: Ross Geredien
Looking up from the task at hand can yield new insights and priorities. Sandcastle at Sunset on Morro Strand State Beach, Morro Bay, CA. Credit: Michael "Mike" L. Baird, Creative Commons License
Meeting energy development needs will require that we convert land from current uses. Photo: Mark Godfrey/TNC
Eurasian collared dove. Photo: lruka under a Creative Commons license
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Photo: Shawn Margles
University of Illinois researchers make a fine diesel oil from plastic grocery bags. Credit: MTSOfan through a  Creative Commons license.
The tiny Gracile Mouse opossum is an almost entirely arboreal species, limited to treed areas. Small forest patches and corridors are key to its survival in human influenced landscapes.   Credit: Noe de la Sancha
Asian longhorned beetle exit holes are perfectly round with a neat edge.  Photo: Jennifer Forman Orth, MDAR
A male babirusa. Photo: Coke Smith, cokesmithphototravel.com
Zebra, Kenya. Image credit: Heather Tallis/TNC
Greenland's Jakobshavn Isbræ glacier--thought to have calved the iceberg that sank the Titanic--flowed at 46 meters a day in the summer of 2012. That's 30-50% faster than previous summers. Photo credit: kriskaer under Creative Commons license.
The Nature Conservancy's conservation initiatives in East Kalimantan, Indonesia. Photo credit: © Nick Hall for The Nature Conservancy
Humpback whale breaching, Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve, National Marine Conservation Area Reserve and Haida Heritage Site, Haida Gwaii. Image credit: Clint Johnson Kendrick/Parks Canada.
A sick ochre star surrounded by apparently healthy ones from Olympic National Park. Photo: Steve Fradkin

Forest Dilemmas

Too many deer. Logging one tree to save another. Beavers versus old growth. Welcome to forest conservation in the Anthropocene. Beginning Monday, July 21, join us for a provocative 5-part series exploring the full complexity facing forest conservation in the eastern United States.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is managed by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications, and edited by Bob Lalasz, its director of science communications. Email us your feedback.

Innovative Science

Investing in Seagrass
Marine scientists and fishers alike know that grass beds are valuable as nursery habitat. A new Conservancy-funded study puts a number to it.

Drones Aid Bird Conservation
How can California conservationists accurately count thousands of cranes? Enter a new tool in bird monitoring: the drone.

Creating a Climate-Smart Agriculture
Can farmers globally both adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change? A new paper answers with a definitive yes. But it won't be easy.

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