7 Cool Facts About Water Striders

They walk on water, they devour mosquito larvae and they have one of the most disturbing mating rituals on earth. Take a close look at this common insect of Northern Hemisphere ponds, creeks and puddles.

Matthew L. Miller

Searching for a Rare Nautilus, Round 2

Conservancy scientists (and one intrepid field reporter) take on a second search for the rare Allonautilus in the Solomon Islands. Success is contextual.

Justine E. Hausheer

Meet the Man Who Got Stung for Science

Justin Schmidt has been stung by an astounding array of bees, wasps and ants. And he’s here to tell the story.

Matthew L. Miller

Recovery: Saving American Burying Beetles, Nature’s Undertakers

American burying beetles once took care of carrion over broad regions of North America. But their numbers have dwindled. What’s going on? And can we save them?

Ted Williams

The Four Biggest Hazards Facing Monarch Butterflies, and How You Can Help

A recent scientific paper argues that monarch butterflies are at risk of “quasi-extinction.” But what does this mean? Our blogger breaks down the issues facing butterflies.

Christine Peterson

Ten Strange, Endearing and Alarming Animal Courtship Rituals

To celebrate humans' holiday of love and romance, our blogger asked biologists for tales of fascinating animal mating habits. Here are some of the strangest and most endearing.

Christine Peterson

The Ten Creepiest Spiders of North America

Spider, spider on the wall, who's the creepiest of them all? Scientists share their picks for the best spiders on the continent -- the most aggressive, the rarest, the most venomous, even the prettiest. Yes, the prettiest.

Christine Peterson

Do the Rumble-Rump with Peacock Spiders

Meet the tiny spider with one of the wildest mating displays in the animal kingdom. Jon Fisher takes you into the realm of the peacock spider and its unbelievable "dance moves."

Jon Fisher

Plight of the Bumble Bee: Conserving Imperiled Native Pollinators

You've probably heard about the loss of honey bees. But did you know native bumble bees face even more alarming declines? These vital pollinators are disappearing due to pesticides and habitat loss. You can make a difference -- right in your backyard.

Matthew L. Miller

Wild Pollinators Are Critical in Keeping our Picnic Baskets Full

Bees may seem like uninvited guests at your picnic – but before you shoo them away from the fruit salad, think twice, as they play a critical role in making your picnic possible. Some of the most healthful, picnic favorites – including blueberries, strawberries, cantaloupe, watermelon, cucumber, avocados and almonds – would not make it to the table without the essential work by bees and other insects. Most crops depend on pollinating insects to produce seeds or fruits. In fact, about <a href="http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/274/1608/303.long"><b>three-quarters</b></a><b> of global food crops</b><b> </b><b>require insect pollination </b>to thrive; <b>one-third of our calories and the </b><a href="http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0021363"><b>majority of critical micronutrients</b></a>, such as vitamins A, C and E, come from animal-pollinated food crops.

Christina Kennedy

The Monarch Butterfly Decline, and What You Can Do About It

A recent report shows monarch butterflies have declined 59 percent in the past year. The reasons may surprise you. And you can help.

Matthew L. Miller

The Yucca and its Moth

It sounds too good to be true; two species helping each other survive for millions of years—each getting as much as they give.

Chris Helzer