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It can be difficult for human observers to accurately count birds when they are in large flocks, as is often the case at California's Staten Island. Photo: © Erika Nortemann
Doug Garletts, a fisheries biologist with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, inspects a fish trap below Lookout Point Dam located on the Middle Fork of the Willamette River at Lowell, Oregon. Photo: ©Bridget Besaw
Benjamin Kilham. Photo: © Boston Globe via Chelsea Green Publishing
More than 500,000 sandhill cranes gather along Nebraska's Platte River each spring. Photo: © Chris Helzer/TNC
There are so many reasons to love the flamboyant wildebeest. Photo credit: John Schinker through a Creative Commons License 2.0
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NatureNet Science Fellow Daniel Karp. Photo courtesy of D. Karp.
Monarch feeding on orange glory, Asclepias tuberosa, a variety of milkweed. Photo courtesy of Lewis Feldkamp.
The range of light bulbs currently found in the author's home. Photo: Craig Leisher/TNC
Is it time to retire the concept of the 100-year flood? Photo: © David Y. Lee
A wombat poo cube. Photo: Bjørn Christian Tørrissen under a Creative Commons license
A forest planner tags trees at a reduced impact logging (RIL) concession in East Kalimanatan, Indonesia. Photo credit: © Bridget Besaw
Ptarmigans have amazing adaptations to life in the cold and snow (beyond their seasonal change of outerwear). White-tailed ptarmigan, (Lagopus leucurus), photographed at Denali National Park in Alaska. Photo credit: Ross Geredien
Looking up from the task at hand can yield new insights and priorities. Sandcastle at Sunset on Morro Strand State Beach, Morro Bay, CA. Credit: Michael "Mike" L. Baird, Creative Commons License
Meeting energy development needs will require that we convert land from current uses. Photo: Mark Godfrey/TNC
Eurasian collared dove. Photo: lruka under a Creative Commons license

Forest Dilemmas

Too many deer. Logging one tree to save another. Beavers versus old growth. Welcome to forest conservation in the Anthropocene. Beginning Monday, July 21, join us for a provocative 5-part series exploring the full complexity facing forest conservation in the eastern United States.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is managed by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications, and edited by Bob Lalasz, its director of science communications. Email us your feedback.

Innovative Science

Investing in Seagrass
Marine scientists and fishers alike know that grass beds are valuable as nursery habitat. A new Conservancy-funded study puts a number to it.

Drones Aid Bird Conservation
How can California conservationists accurately count thousands of cranes? Enter a new tool in bird monitoring: the drone.

Creating a Climate-Smart Agriculture
Can farmers globally both adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change? A new paper answers with a definitive yes. But it won't be easy.

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