Solar Energy Development Doesn’t Have to Destroy Vital Habitat (but It Could)

With careful planning, the U.S. could produce needed solar energy and still protect lands important for animal movement and migration.

Cara Cannon Byington

Story type: TNC Science Brief

Frogs as Pollinators?

This Brazilian frog may pollinate milk fruit trees as it visits flowers to sip nectar.

Christine Peterson

50 Fish, 50 States: Overlooked Native Fish in National Parks

50 Fish, 50 States: Matt Miller searches for chubs and sauger on the Little Missouri River in North Dakota.

Matthew L. Miller

Mad Island: Fire Restores Prairie on the Texas Gulf Coast

To restore the prairie, you have to burn it.

Matthew L. Miller

The Nature Conservancy Announces Expansion of First dFAD Partnership

This year on World Tuna Day, The Nature Conservancy (TNC) Hawai‘i and Palmyra announces the expansion of the first drifting […]

The Editors

The First World Map of Tidal Marshes

A new global map of tidal marshes, one of the world’s most productive ecosystems.

Mark Spalding

What It’s Like to Document California’s Disappearing Kelp Forests

Documentary filmmaker Tyler Schiffman turns his camera onto the people rushing to save a marine ecosystem on the verge of collapse.

Jenny Rogers

What Happens When You Expose an Oyster to Crab Pee?

To build stronger oyster reefs, scientists are scaring them with one of their fiercest predators: blue crabs.

Jenny Rogers

Dorado Catfish: Protecting an Epic Migration

The Amazon’s dorado catfish undertakes a 6,500 mile round-trip migration, vital for the ecosystem and humans alike

Matthew L. Miller

Tune In to the Great Salt Lake Kestrel Cam

Spring is in full swing in Utah, which means our annual kestrel cam is back.

Justine E. Hausheer

From eDNA to Breaking Barriers

Meet Dr. Tiara Moore, founder of Black in Marine Science, using new science to inform conservation from the forest to the sea.

Matthew L. Miller

Why Are Some Wolves Black? The Answer Will Surprise You

Black wolves are more common in some populations than others, and recent research finds a surprising correlation.

Christine Peterson