Science: Mangrove Forests as Incredible Carbon Stores

Based on these new findings, says Conservancy marine scientist Mark Spalding, the world should be investing a lot more in preventing mangrove loss and restoration.

Mark Spalding

How Green is Your Chainsaw?

Can a chainsaw be green? That may sound ridiculous, but in the forests of Borneo, loggers can be a critical ally in maintaining biodiversity and mitigating climate change.

Bronson Griscom

Traveling Naturalist: Elephants, Kudus and More in Tarangire National Park

The Traveling Naturalist visits Tarangire National Park in northern Tanzania, home to one of the largest herds of elephants in Africa, unusual antelope, migrating zebras, lions and warthogs and much, much more. Can it stay that way? Does tourism help?

Matthew L. Miller

After the Clearcuts: People, Ecology & the Way Forward in an Alaska Rainforest

Is there a way to ecologically restore the forests on Prince of Wales while also creating economic opportunities for local communities? That’s the question at the heart of research and work here by Nature Conservancy foresters.

Matthew L. Miller

Traveling Naturalist: 5 Top Spots to See Yellowstone’s Wildlife

Heading to America's first national park? Our blogger points you to the best spots to see Yellowstone's diverse wildlife, including creatures very, very large and those very, very small.

Matthew L. Miller

New Study: Coastal Nature Reduces Risk from Storm Impacts for 1.3 Million U.S. Residents

Nature reduces risk from coastal storms for millions of U.S. residents and billions of dollars in property values, says a new study from scientists at the Natural Capital Project and The Nature Conservancy.

Bob Lalasz

Quick Study: Do REDD+ Projects Benefit People as Well as Forests?

They often provide modest but tangible benefits to local communities--and don't encourage land grabs, says a new article co-authored by the Conservancy's senior advisor on forests and climate. But challenges remain to meaningful community participation in these projects.

Jonathan Adams

Bison Bellows and Bones: Student-Scientists on the Prairie

Bison fighting and urinating on themselves? It's just another day at the office for student researchers on TNC's Ordway Prairie.

Matthew L. Miller

Quick Study: A California-Style Approach to Sustainable Fisheries

<i>Quick Study is just what it says — a rapid-fire look at a new conservation science study that might turn some heads.</i> <b>The Question(s): </b>For decades, ocean bottom trawling has been the predominate method for catching groundfish (like flounder, halibut and sole) along the U.S. West Coast. But dragging weighted nets across the seafloor is destructive to bottom habitats and can result in large amounts of bycatch (netting of other species, including some that are ecologically valuable). Could a market-based approach to buy out trawl permits, combined with a collaborative effort to identify and protect ecologically sensitive areas, help protect species and a fishing industry?

Darci Palmquist

The Traveling Naturalist: Solid Gold in the Rockies

<i>Introducing The Traveling Naturalist, a new series featuring natural wonders and biological curiosities for the science-inclined wanderer.</i> The Rocky Mountains in the spring are a <b>botanist’s delight</b>, with many hills, mountain meadows and buttes awash in color. Wildflowers – many of them with interesting natural and human histories – can be easily found on your public lands. Some exist in bright but tiny cluster on alpine peaks while others cover meadows in a palette of seemingly solid color. <b>My favorite</b>: the flower that paints many foothills bright gold throughout the West, <a href="http://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/plant-of-the-week/balsamorhiza_sagittata.shtml"><b>arrowleaf balsamroot</b></a> (<i>Balsamorhiza sagittata). </i>

Matthew L. Miller

The Yucca and its Moth

It sounds too good to be true; two species helping each other survive for millions of years—each getting as much as they give.

Chris Helzer

Big Fish: Rodent-Eating Trout

Key up the Jaws soundtrack. For years, anglers have claimed Silver Creek's brown trout feed on rodents. Does the science back them up?

Matthew L. Miller