Holly Copeland

Holly Copeland has worked as a Conservation Scientist/Spatial Ecologist with the Wyoming Chapter of the Nature Conservancy for the past 17 years, where her research has focused on a range of Western conservation issues such as forecasting future impacts of energy development on wildlife, mitigation planning, climate change, and wetland and riparian health. Recent and current projects include modeling mule deer migration corridors and benefits of sage-grouse conservation to mule deer, mapping mule deer migrations in Eastern Yellowstone, understanding current and future mule deer highway mortality in Wyoming, modeling the benefits of conservation easements to greater sage-grouse populations, developing models of lead risk to condor populations in California, and developing wetland condition assessments for priority basins. She holds degrees in geography from the University of Wyoming and the University of California, Davis.

Publications

Sage Grouse

Burkhalter, C., Holloran, M.J., Fedy, B.C., Copeland, H.E., Crabtree, R.L., Michel, N.L., Jay, S.C., Rutledge, B.A. & Holloran, A.G. (2018). Landscape-scale habitat assessment for an imperiled avian species. Animal Conservation, doi: 10.1111/acv.12382

Copeland, H. E.,  et al. (2014). Conserving migratory mule deer through the umbrella of sage-grouse. Ecosphere, 5, art117.

Copeland, H. E.,  et al. (2013) Measuring the effectiveness of conservation: a novel framework to quantify the benefits of sage-grouse conservation policy and easements in Wyoming. PLoS ONE, 8, e67261.

Naugle, D.E. (2011). Sage-Grouse and cumulative impacts of energy development. In: Energy development and wildlife conservation in western North America. 55-70.

Energy

Pocewicz, A., et al. (2013). Modeling the Distribution of Migratory Bird Stopovers to Inform Landscape-Scale Siting of Wind Development. PLoS ONE, 8, e75363.

Kiesecker J.M., et al. (2010). Development by design: blending landscape-level planning with the mitigation hierarchy. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 8, 261–266.

Copeland, H.E., et al. (2009). Mapping oil and gas development potential in the US Intermountain West and estimating impacts to species. PLoS ONE, 4, e7400.

Kiesecker J.M., et al. (2009). A framework for implementing biodiversity offsets: selecting sites and determining scaleBioScience, 59, 77-84.

California Condors

Bakker, V.J., Smith, D.R., Copeland, H., et al. (2017). Effects of lead exposure, flock behavior, and management actions on the survival of California condors (Gymnogyps californianus). EcoHealth, doi: 10.1007/s10393-015-1096-2

Finkelstein, M.E., Bakker, V.J., Copeland, H., Burnett, J., Jones Scherbinski, J., Brandt, J. & Kurle, C.M. (2017). Reply to Comment on “Terrestrial Scavenging of Marine Mammals: Cross-Ecosystem Contaminant Transfer and Potential Risks to Endangered California Condors (Gymnogyps californianus).” Environ. Sci. Technol., 51, 5349–5350.

Kurle, C.M., Bakker, V.J., Copeland, H., Burnett, J., Jones Scherbinski, J., Brandt, J. & Finkelstein, M.E. (2016). Terrestrial Scavenging of Marine Mammals: Cross-Ecosystem Contaminant Transfer and Potential Risks to Endangered California Condors (Gymnogyps californianus). Environ. Sci. Technol., 50, 9114–9123.

Holly's posts