Category: Asia Pacific

Protecting the Yela Forest: A New & Improved Conservation Tool for Micronesia

Written by | March 31st, 2014

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Conservation easements have a long history as an effective land protection tool in the United States. Could easements now change conservation in the Pacific? A new easement on the Micronesian island on Kosrae is the first use of the tool outside the Americas.

Orang You Glad Your Chair is from a Sustainable Source?

Written by | January 31st, 2014

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More than half of the wood products consumed in major markets come from somewhere else. In 2010, the United States was the top buyer of wood furniture from the Asia Pacific region. That might just include your favorite chair.

The Green Buzz: Tuesday, January 28

Written by | January 28th, 2014

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In today’s green news, a glimpse into ancient forest management and bad news for the big fish and the small fish.

  1. Warmer seas are causing species of fish to mature earlier, stunting their maximum length by up to 29% in the North Sea (The Guardian)
  2. Indigenous peoples have been carefully managed the rainforests of Asia for 11,000 years by seamlessly clearing pockets of vegetation for agriculture, new findings reveal. (Mongabay)
  3. A large shark was killed off the coast of Western Australia, the first to be connected to a new shark cull that was put into place to prevent human fatalities. (CNN)

 

 

 

The Green Buzz: Wednesday, November 20

Written by | November 20th, 2013

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We’re blogging about nature’s heroes, promiscuous mice and controversial hunting in today’s green news.

  1. Bioluminescent bay in Puerto Rico goes dark: what happened? (Christian Science Monitor)
  2. Hawaii’s Big Island bans GMO crops. (Huffington Post Green)
  3. Mangroves are the heroes in protecting this Southeast Asian town from typhoon Haiyan. (Bloomberg)
  4. Big game hunter Melissa Bachman sparks controversy with this lion photo. (National Geographic)
  5. This headline is too funny not to share: promiscuous mice bear sexier smelling sons. (BBC)

Rules of Engagement: Solomon Islanders Prepare for Mining

Written by | November 6th, 2013

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With mining proposed across the Solomon Islands, how will the decisions and agreements made now shape the country’s future?

The Green Buzz: Wednesday, October 16

Written by | October 16th, 2013

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In today’s green news, a giant deep sea fish, a deficit of nature and something for which to check food labels.

  1. There’s a fox in the hen house…err, in the white house gardens, and the shutdown means it stays for now. (Atlantic Monthly)
  2. Airborne agricultural pollution is threatening national parks across the country. (LA Times)
  3. Check your food labels for this oil, because it’s destroying rainforests in Indonesia. (New York Times)
  4. Holy oarfish! This 18-foot, rarely seen, deep sea creature was found off California’s coast. (National Geographic)
  5. Nature deficit disorder is “damaging” children. Get them outside! (BBC News)

Celebrating 5 Years in Mongolia

Written by | September 16th, 2013

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Charles Bedford has been going to Mongolia for many years and we recently caught up with him after his most recent visit to attend the Mongolia Green Development Conference in UlaanBaatar, a conference held to mark the 5th anniversary of the Conservancy’s Mongolia program.

The Green Buzz: Thursday, August 22

Written by | August 22nd, 2013

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Today’s green news is all about animals!

  1. The number of dolphin deaths on the east coast continues to alarm researchers. (LA Times)
  2. This jumping caterpillar uses the sun — while shrouded in a leaf — to figure out where to go! (MNN)
  3. Illegal palm oil development in Thailand causes monkeys to stop having babies, using tools. (BBC News)
  4. Looks like birds might pay attention to speed limits more than some humans do! (National Geographic)
  5. What does the Fukushima leak mean for the America? (Discovery News)

It’s a Mistake for NGOs Not to Engage with Hydropower Companies

Written by | August 20th, 2013

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Hydropower may be controversial, but NGOs must engage with the hydropower community to ensure the impact is positive, says our managing director of global freshwater.

The Last Tree for Orangutans

Written by | August 16th, 2013

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Orangutans are in trouble because their habitat is diminishing at an unsustainable rate. This World Orangutan Day, we take a look at their plight.

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