Tag: The Nature Conservancy

Green is Good: Science-Based Conservation in the 21st Century

What does it mean for The Nature Conservancy to be “science-based” today? To always be casting a wider net for better solutions supported by evidence, write Mark Tercek and Peter Kareiva.

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Can Mangroves Adapt to Rising Seas?

Mangroves have had a hard-knock life, with coastal development destroying at least 35% of the world’s tidal forests in recent decades. Scientists have feared that rising seas would be the final blow. But mangroves just might be able to rise above, says a new report.

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Quick Study: When Can Eating More Fish Actually Benefit Fish Populations and Fishermen?

What effect does consumer demand have on fish populations? If you assumed it would be negative, this case study from Nature Conservancy scientist Sheila Walsh and others might make you re-think your position.

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The Cooler: Celebrity Species and the Science Deficit Model

Do conservation NGOs use tigers, lions and pandas to market and fundraise at the expense of other threatened species? David Salt and Hugh Possingham say yes. Here’s why their solution isn’t the answer.

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Quick Study: How Will Climate Change Affect Irrigation of Farm Lands in U.S.?

Quick Study is just what it says — a rapid-fire look at a new conservation science study that might turn some heads.

The Study: McDonald, R. and E. Girvetz. 2013. Two challenges for U.S. irrigation due to climate change: increasing irrigated area in wet states and increasing irrigation rates in dry statesPLoS ONE 8(6): e65589. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0065589.

The Questions: Climate change models forecast higher average temperatures that will cause crop-growing seasons in the United States to become hotter and drier. How will this impact the irrigation needs of agriculture in the United States? And how will farmers respond to drier conditions?

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For Some Elephants, an Uncertain — But Not Stressful — Future

In a thick pocket of acacia trees, a group of savannah elephants quietly munch leaves. Tails swing, ears flip and flap. Occasionally one scoops up a trunk full of dirt and tosses it across its face and back, to cool the hide and displace insects.

A few yards away, 3 researchers crouch in the brush, watching and filming. The setting seems peaceful and quiet, but the researchers are tensely aware: wild elephants can charge if frightened or startled. And the last thing a scientist wants is to be charged by the largest land animal in the world — especially while in pursuit of its poop.

Yes, poop.

“We needed fresh dung in order to gather DNA material,” explains grasslands ecologist Marissa Ahlering of The Nature Conservancy. But what for? While collecting dung samples from wild elephants is somewhat dangerous and far from glamorous (see video), the work has been providing useful insight into whether elephant populations in Kenya could live in proximity to people and livestock without stress.

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Quick Study: A California-Style Approach to Sustainable Fisheries

Quick Study is just what it says — a rapid-fire look at a new conservation science study that might turn some heads.

The Question(s): For decades, ocean bottom trawling has been the predominate method for catching groundfish (like flounder, halibut and sole) along the U.S. West Coast. But dragging weighted nets across the seafloor is destructive to bottom habitats and can result in large amounts of bycatch (netting of other species, including some that are ecologically valuable). Could a market-based approach to buy out trawl permits, combined with a collaborative effort to identify and protect ecologically sensitive areas, help protect species and a fishing industry?

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What’s the Future of Energy? Find Out May 13th in Boston

Oil, fracking, wind, solar, nuclear, wave — where does nature fit into the development of all these energy forms? Put another way: Can nature and humanity’s ever-increasing demands for energy possibly coexist?

That’s the big subject of the next panel discussion in the series “The Future of Nature,” co-sponsored by The Nature Conservancy and WBUR, Boston’s National Public Radio news station. The event — “The Future of Energy” — takes place in Boston next Monday starting at 7:30 PM at the Boston Society of Architects and features these speakers:

Dan Kammen, professor and director of the Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory, UC Berkeley

Jigar Shah, partner, Inerjys clean-energy investment firm

* Joe Fargione, science director, North America Region, The Nature Conservancy

Anthony Brooks, co-host of WBUR’s Radio Boston, will moderate. We’ll cover the discussion next week here on Cool Green Science. But if you’re interested in attending, learn more (including how to register for the event) and read about The Future of Nature series, including June 10′s “The Future of Water” event.

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Forest Dilemmas

Too many deer. Logging one tree to save another. Beavers versus old growth. Welcome to forest conservation in the 21st century. Join us for a provocative 5-part series exploring the full complexity facing forest conservation in the eastern United States.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is managed by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications, and edited by Bob Lalasz, its director of science communications. Email us your feedback.

Innovative Science

Investing in Seagrass
Marine scientists and fishers alike know that grass beds are valuable as nursery habitat. A new Conservancy-funded study puts a number to it.

Drones Aid Bird Conservation
How can California conservationists accurately count thousands of cranes? Enter a new tool in bird monitoring: the drone.

Creating a Climate-Smart Agriculture
Can farmers globally both adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change? A new paper answers with a definitive yes. But it won't be easy.

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