Tag: Science

On Understanding Varying Approaches among Conservation Professionals

How do conservation professionals focus their decisions? A new article in the journal Human Ecology finds surprising answers — and a fundamental difference in conservation approaches.

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Citizen Science Tuesday: Project BudBurst

Our new series connects you to citizen science projects that benefit conservation. First up: record when trees bloom and wildflowers blossom to help Project BudBurst track the effects of climate change.

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Leech Logic and the Need for Conservation Baselines

For 2,000 years people thought leeches cured just about any ailment. Silly? Blogger Craig Leisher argues that conservationists often take a similar anecdote-based approach, which is why the field desperately needs solid baseline data.

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Is Natural History Still Relevant for Conservation Science?

As conservation science increasingly draws from sophisticated models and genomics, does natural history still have relevance? Benjamin Kilham, a dyslexic who has made significant contributions to bear research, builds a powerful case for field observation in his book, “Out on a Limb.”

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Giulio Boccaletti: What Scientific Idea is Ready for Retirement?

In hydrology, a concept known as stationarity allows us to define events using time statistics, like the “one in a hundred years flood.” Dr. Giulio Boccaletti argues that it’s time to retire this concept.

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Cool Green Science: Year in Review 2013

Thanks for making Cool Green Science one of the world’s most-read conservation science blogs — in just its first year! Here’s a look back at our most popular stories from 2013.

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Re-Branding Nature: From Dismal Swamp to Constructed Wetland

Swamps were once considered disease-ridden, alligator-infested places. Now they’re hailed for the ecosystem services they provide–but for that image to stick, constructed wetlands have to be based on the best-available science.

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Remembering Alfred Russel Wallace

Remembering Alfred Russel Wallace, co-discoverer of evolution and conservation great, on the centennial of his passing.

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Star Spangled Science: Bouncing Back from Hurricane Sandy

Wanted: a PhD who can win a bar fight. That might seem like an unusual job qualification, but it came in handy when developing science-based responses to Superstorm Sandy.

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New Report: What Will the Urban Century Mean for Nature?

Can biodiversity thrive in an increasingly urban world — or are the predictions of disasters destined to be correct? A new UN report co-authored by TNC’s Rob McDonald has some surprising answers.

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Heather Tallis Becomes Lead Scientist at The Nature Conservancy

Heather Tallis, one of the world’s foremost analysts of the connections between nature and human well-being, has agreed to join The Nature Conservancy as lead scientist.

Tallis, 36, will become the first woman to serve as lead scientist in the Conservancy’s history. She joins M. Sanjayan as one of two lead scientists for the organization.

“Heather brings incredible expertise in understanding and measuring how conservation impacts people,” says Peter Kareiva, chief scientist for The Nature Conservancy. “She will be leading new efforts that conservation desperately needs — a scientific focus on how our work can both improve human well-being while also protecting biodiversity.”

Tallis comes to the Conservancy from her position as lead scientist for the Natural Capital Project, a path-breaking scientific collaboration based at Stanford University that seeks to understand and measure the economic values of nature. Measuring these ecosystem services — the benefits that nature provide people in the form of clean water, fertile soil, clean air and much more — has become increasingly important as human activity stresses natural resources and extreme weather events push communities to consider how healthy nature can buffer and protect us.

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Welcome to Cool Green Science

Welcome to Cool Green Science, the conservation science blog of The Nature Conservancy.

The Nature Conservancy has 550 staff with advanced science degrees, and they publish more than 200 peer-reviewed articles annually.

In all 50 states and 36 countries, our scientists pursue the latest conservation research to make the most difference for people and nature.

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This Week on Cool Green Science: Change & The Eastern U.S. Forest

Too many deer. Logging one tree to save another. Beavers versus old growth. Welcome to forest conservation in the Anthropocene. Beginning Monday, July 21, join us for a provocative 5-part series exploring the full complexity facing forest conservation in the eastern United States.

Featured Content

Osprey Cam: Watch Our Wild Neighbors
Watch the ospreys live 24/7 as they nest and raise their young -- and learn more about these fascinating birds from our scientist.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is managed by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications, and edited by Bob Lalasz, its director of science communications. Email us your feedback.

Innovative Science

Investing in Seagrass
Marine scientists and fishers alike know that grass beds are valuable as nursery habitat. A new Conservancy-funded study puts a number to it.

Drones Aid Bird Conservation
How can California conservationists accurately count thousands of cranes? Enter a new tool in bird monitoring: the drone.

Creating a Climate-Smart Agriculture
Can farmers globally both adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change? A new paper answers with a definitive yes. But it won't be easy.

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