Tag: PLoS One

How Can We Make Energy Security Sustainable?

Meeting our energy development needs will require converting land from current uses. That’s a given. But can we achieve energy security without risking the security of the lands and waters on which all life depends?

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Rights of De-extinct Animals, Dark Money, Magic Mushrooms & More

Also in our Friday best of the web: New understanding of invasive plants, the science behind prairie dogs’ jump-yipping, and why three reasons might be better than six.

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Can Protecting Core Areas Help Imperiled Sage Grouse Populations?

Can protecting core sage grouse habitat while allowing energy and housing development in less-sensitive areas help conserve this declining bird? That’s the focus of a recent paper in PLoS One journal that measures the effectiveness of sage grouse conservation actions in Wyoming, the state with the largest population of these birds.

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The Cooler: PLoS ONE and the Panic Over Impact

A free, online-only journal sees its impact ranking drop because it’s so popular with researchers. Should scientists abandon it?

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Flushing Out the Truth About Sewage and Coral Reefs

I never expected to be so intrigued and excited about poop, until a paper in PloS ONE came out in 2011 that demonstrated that a common human pathogen found in human wastewater, Serratia marcescens strain PDR60, caused white pox disease in elkhorn coral (Acropora palmata), the foundation species in Caribbean coral reefs.

Caribbean reefs have been plagued by disease in recent years and figuring out the source of the pathogens has been a challenge. Human sewage has long been a suspect, but the science behind this suspicion was always tenuous. I think most people would assume that exposing reefs to partially treated or untreated sewage couldn’t be a good thing, but there were no clear data that made the connection of human sewage to the degradation of corals so clearly until this paper.

Unfortunately, there is plenty of untreated sewage making its way into tropical seas.

In the Caribbean, most sewage isn’t actually treated, rather it is put into containers that sit in the ground — the ground being comprised of porous calcium carbonate rock (limestone) that is characteristically leaky.

In many places in the Pacific, the ocean is the toilet.

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Forest Dilemmas

Too many deer. Logging one tree to save another. Beavers versus old growth. Welcome to forest conservation in the Anthropocene. Beginning Monday, July 21, join us for a provocative 5-part series exploring the full complexity facing forest conservation in the eastern United States.

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How can California conservationists accurately count thousands of cranes? Enter a new tool in bird monitoring: the drone.

Creating a Climate-Smart Agriculture
Can farmers globally both adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change? A new paper answers with a definitive yes. But it won't be easy.

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