Tag: nature

Citizen Science Tuesday: National Moth Week

Get ready for National Moth Week! Find out about mothing events in your area and how you can contribute to the science on moths.

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Citizen Science Tuesday: Rocky Mountain Amphibian Project

A citizen science program that’s looking for amphibians in Wyoming? Yes, and Boy Scouts find out how you can earn a Merit Badge for that!

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Citizen Science Tuesday: FrogWatch USA

Citizen Science Tuesday connects you to projects that benefit conservation. This week: go on a treasure hunt with FrogWatch USA to support declining amphibian populations.

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Citizen Science Tuesday: Pika Project

Citizen Science Tuesday connects you to projects that benefit conservation. This week: go to the mountains and take some pika pics.

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Citizen Science Tuesday: Project BudBurst

Our new series connects you to citizen science projects that benefit conservation. First up: record when trees bloom and wildflowers blossom to help Project BudBurst track the effects of climate change.

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Re-Branding Nature: From Dismal Swamp to Constructed Wetland

Swamps were once considered disease-ridden, alligator-infested places. Now they’re hailed for the ecosystem services they provide–but for that image to stick, constructed wetlands have to be based on the best-available science.

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Meet the NatureNet Fellows: Rob McDonald

Conservationists have typically viewed cities as the enemy of the environment — to embrace urban growth is akin to heresy. But that viewpoint is changing by necessity.

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Remembering Alfred Russel Wallace

Remembering Alfred Russel Wallace, co-discoverer of evolution and conservation great, on the centennial of his passing.

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Star Spangled Science: Bouncing Back from Hurricane Sandy

Wanted: a PhD who can win a bar fight. That might seem like an unusual job qualification, but it came in handy when developing science-based responses to Superstorm Sandy.

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New Report: What Will the Urban Century Mean for Nature?

Can biodiversity thrive in an increasingly urban world — or are the predictions of disasters destined to be correct? A new UN report co-authored by TNC’s Rob McDonald has some surprising answers.

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Quick Study: Why Conservation Science Needs to Get Interdisciplinary–and Why It Hasn’t

Being multidisciplinary isn’t enough for today’s conservation science, says a new study by Conservancy scientist Sheila Walsh Reddy and others–we need to get out of our siloes in order to help solve the world’s most pressing problems. But being truly interdisciplinary can be costly and difficult.

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People and Nature: Announcing Our New Social Scientists

To solve today’s conservation problems, we need multi-disciplinary scientists who can look at how nature impacts people. Enter The Nature Conservancy’s 3 new social scientists, who will be working on the front lines of conservation for the benefit of people.

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Everyday Nature: Cartoonish Coot Chicks

Most baby birds, cute though they may be, are not exactly colorful. This makes good evolutionary sense: Baby birds, unable to fly, make easy meals for predators.

They thus must blend into their surroundings. A drake mallard or canvasback is a colorful, striking water bird, but baby ducks are nondescript. They disappear into the marshy reeds, making it harder for a hungry raccoon or mink to find them.

Not so the American coot.

Adult coots are fairly drab birds. But their babies? They look like they were designed by a deranged tattoo artist.

The front half of the coot’s body is covered in orange-tipped plumes, giving them a jarring appearance. We’re not used to seeing baby birds covered bright feathers. While this orange fades rather quickly—in about six days—it still leaves them conspicuous when they are at the most vulnerable stage of their lives.

This coloration makes them more susceptible to predation. What advantage would such feathers possibly confer?

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Forest Dilemmas

Too many deer. Logging one tree to save another. Beavers versus old growth. Welcome to forest conservation in the Anthropocene. Beginning Monday, July 21, join us for a provocative 5-part series exploring the full complexity facing forest conservation in the eastern United States.

Featured Content

Osprey Cam: Watch Our Wild Neighbors
Watch the ospreys live 24/7 as they nest and raise their young -- and learn more about these fascinating birds from our scientist.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is managed by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications, and edited by Bob Lalasz, its director of science communications. Email us your feedback.

Innovative Science

Investing in Seagrass
Marine scientists and fishers alike know that grass beds are valuable as nursery habitat. A new Conservancy-funded study puts a number to it.

Drones Aid Bird Conservation
How can California conservationists accurately count thousands of cranes? Enter a new tool in bird monitoring: the drone.

Creating a Climate-Smart Agriculture
Can farmers globally both adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change? A new paper answers with a definitive yes. But it won't be easy.

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