Tag: mammals

Rudolph Versus Bambi: A Conservation Dilemma

For your holiday reading: Rudolph versus Bambi? It’s a real struggle between endangered woodland caribou and too-abundant white-tailed deer along the U.S./Canada border. “Bambi” is winning. Can conservationists do anything about it?

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Urban Wild: Flying Squirrels of the Beltway

To see the southern flying squirrel, you don’t make a trek into the wilderness or visit a national park. You need to visit a small nature preserve a short distance away from the bustling urbanity of the U.S. capitol.

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Of “Pizzlies” and Goose Dinners: The Latest Research on Polar Bears

Some call the polar bear a “climate change cliche.” And yet our interest in this Arctic animal only grows. What’s the latest? Enjoy our digest of recent polar bear research, media commentary and debate.

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Video: Wyoming’s Great Migration

Across the Intermountain West, mule deer, pronghorns and other ungulates are on the move. The latest research offers a new glimpse into these old migrations. A video from the Wyoming Migration Initiative offers a good intro to this perilous journey.

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Quagga: Can an Extinct Animal be Bred Back into Existence?

In South Africa, there’s an ambitious effort underway to restore the quagga. The one complicating factor? Quaggas have been extinct since the 1800s. Is this innovative conservation at its finest, or an expensive gimmick?

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Review: Alan Rabinowitz’s An Indomitable Beast

Why has the jaguar fared better than tigers and lions? How can we conserve these big cats in the face of development and other pressures? A remarkable scientific journey leads to a new look at this elusive creature in Alan Rabinowitz’s An Indomitable Beast.

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Big Gulp: How Often Do Trout and Grayling Eat Mammals?

Many anglers know that trout eat the occasional mouse or shrew. But how often does this actually occur? New research from Bristol Bay on the dietary habits of rainbow trout and grayling suggests this answer: More often than you think.

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10 Great State Parks for Wildlife

Sure, national parks get all the press. But across the United States, state parks offer incredible opportunities for birders, wildlife photographers and other naturalists. Here are ten of the best.

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Update: Another Ocelot Killed in South Texas

Our series earlier this month focused on the issues facing ocelots along the border in South Texas. In a place where every cat counts, there has since been another sad loss of an ocelot on Texas roads. What can be done to stop the carnage?

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Beavers Versus Old Growth: The Tough Reality of Conservation

If ecologically important but abundant native beavers threaten ecologically important but imperiled old growth hemlocks, what should conservationists do? Leave it to beaver? Or save the hemlocks?

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Pygmy Rabbit Quest

Meet the pygmy rabbit: the tiniest rabbit on earth, and one of the most difficult North American mammals to spot. Our blogger journeys to southwest Wyoming to learn more about this elusive inhabitant of big sagebrush.

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Connecting The Ocelot’s Home on the Range

In South Texas, ocelot conservation means connecting the dots. But those “dots” happen to be thornscrub habitat — thick brush incompatible with most human use. How do you restore a habitat that ranchers have spent decades working hard to clear.

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Every Cat Counts: Conserving Ocelots on the Border

In South Texas, ocelots cling to a precarious existence. How do these spotted cats survive against a backdrop of lost habitat, roads and now a border fence? Can conservation efforts help?

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Nilgai: Blue Antelope of the Anthropocene

Once the nilgai roamed expansive Indian plains as it avoided stalking tigers. A creature of wilderness. Today, you’re more likely to find it in sprawling cities, or galloping along a Gulf Coast seashore. A creature of the Anthropocene.

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Review: Cristina Eisenberg’s The Carnivore Way

Can we really expect a growing population to live alongside large predators? Don’t we have a hard enough time with less dangerous critters? Cristina Eisenberg looks at the science, and lays out a blueprint for coexistence between people and predators in her new book, The Carnivore Way.

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Diverse Conservation

Call for Inclusive Conservation
Join Heather Tallis in a call to increase the diversity of voices and values in the conservation debate.

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TNC Lead Scientist Heather Tallis is researching how to make people see nature as critical to life through three lenses: education, water and poverty.

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