Tag: mammals

Big Gulp: How Often Do Trout and Grayling Eat Mammals?

Many anglers know that trout eat the occasional mouse or shrew. But how often does this actually occur? New research from Bristol Bay on the dietary habits of rainbow trout and grayling suggests this answer: More often than you think.

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10 Great State Parks for Wildlife

Sure, national parks get all the press. But across the United States, state parks offer incredible opportunities for birders, wildlife photographers and other naturalists. Here are ten of the best.

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Update: Another Ocelot Killed in South Texas

Our series earlier this month focused on the issues facing ocelots along the border in South Texas. In a place where every cat counts, there has since been another sad loss of an ocelot on Texas roads. What can be done to stop the carnage?

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Beavers Versus Old Growth: The Tough Reality of Conservation

If ecologically important but abundant native beavers threaten ecologically important but imperiled old growth hemlocks, what should conservationists do? Leave it to beaver? Or save the hemlocks?

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Pygmy Rabbit Quest

Meet the pygmy rabbit: the tiniest rabbit on earth, and one of the most difficult North American mammals to spot. Our blogger journeys to southwest Wyoming to learn more about this elusive inhabitant of big sagebrush.

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Connecting The Ocelot’s Home on the Range

In South Texas, ocelot conservation means connecting the dots. But those “dots” happen to be thornscrub habitat — thick brush incompatible with most human use. How do you restore a habitat that ranchers have spent decades working hard to clear.

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Every Cat Counts: Conserving Ocelots on the Border

In South Texas, ocelots cling to a precarious existence. How do these spotted cats survive against a backdrop of lost habitat, roads and now a border fence? Can conservation efforts help?

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Nilgai: Blue Antelope of the Anthropocene

Once the nilgai roamed expansive Indian plains as it avoided stalking tigers. A creature of wilderness. Today, you’re more likely to find it in sprawling cities, or galloping along a Gulf Coast seashore. A creature of the Anthropocene.

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Review: Cristina Eisenberg’s The Carnivore Way

Can we really expect a growing population to live alongside large predators? Don’t we have a hard enough time with less dangerous critters? Cristina Eisenberg looks at the science, and lays out a blueprint for coexistence between people and predators in her new book, The Carnivore Way.

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10 Top National Wildlife Refuges To Explore

For the traveling naturalist, there’s a lifetime of adventures to be found on national wildlife refuges. But with 560 refuges, where to start? Our blogger offers up his favorites for birds and other wildlife, from spotting tropical specialties in Texas to hiking amongst bighorn sheep in Oregon.

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Coyote Scat and Native Plant Conservation

Cultivating native plants for conservation requires the perfect water, sunlight, nutrients and pollinators. And in at least one case, it needs coyote poop. And lots of it. A story of an observant naturalist, palm seeds and hungry coyotes in South Texas.

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Northern Elephant Seals: A Dramatic Conservation Success

Northern elephant seals were declared extinct, a victim of the blubber trade. Today, you can see thousands on California beaches, and the population continues to grow. The story of a dramatic (and often unheralded) conservation success.

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What Does a Baby Whale Feel Like?

Once, grey whales — called “devil fish” by whalers for their tendency to fight — were hunted ruthlessly, almost to the point of oblivion. Today, they approach boats and allow themselves to be petted. Marine blogger Alison Green gets up close and personal with these ocean giants.

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Spring’s Top 10 Wildlife Spectacles

Looking for a great wildlife road trip, or just a reason to explore the neighborhood park? Our blogger offers top 10 wildlife experiences for spring, from baby bison to mayfly madness.

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Is Natural History Still Relevant for Conservation Science?

As conservation science increasingly draws from sophisticated models and genomics, does natural history still have relevance? Benjamin Kilham, a dyslexic who has made significant contributions to bear research, builds a powerful case for field observation in his book, “Out on a Limb.”

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Forest Dilemmas

Too many deer. Logging one tree to save another. Beavers versus old growth. Welcome to forest conservation in the 21st century. Join us for a provocative 5-part series exploring the full complexity facing forest conservation in the eastern United States.

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3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is managed by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications, and edited by Bob Lalasz, its director of science communications. Email us your feedback.

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How can California conservationists accurately count thousands of cranes? Enter a new tool in bird monitoring: the drone.

Creating a Climate-Smart Agriculture
Can farmers globally both adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change? A new paper answers with a definitive yes. But it won't be easy.

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