Tag: Invasive species

Logging Ash to Save Hemlocks

The preserve was established specifically to protect trees from logging. But what happens when waves of forest pests are going to kill trees anyway? What if logging one tree could help save another? What trees live and what trees die? Welcome to forest conservation decisions, 2014 edition.

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Can Integrated Pest Management Save the Eastern Hemlock?

Around the eastern US, hemlocks are dying. Fast. Can anything save them? Some hopeful answers emerge from a Pennsylvania forest preserve.

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Change Comes to the Eastern Forest: Five-Part Series Begins Today

Woodbourne Forest Preserve in north-central Pennsylvania was to remain pristine and free of human management. Free of human management, that is, unless there were extraordinary, unforeseen circumstances. Those extraordinary circumstances are here. Welcome to forest conservation in the Anthropocene.

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Prevention Offers a Better Way to Deal with Invasive Species

A believer in the ‘ounce of prevention’ philosophy, Doria Gordon develops risk assessment tools to help head off troublesome and expensive invasive species.

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Nilgai: Blue Antelope of the Anthropocene

Once the nilgai roamed expansive Indian plains as it avoided stalking tigers. A creature of wilderness. Today, you’re more likely to find it in sprawling cities, or galloping along a Gulf Coast seashore. A creature of the Anthropocene.

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Fading Forests: The High Cost of Invasive Pests

In the past 12 years, 28 new invasive pests have been introduced to North American forests, exacting high ecological and economic tolls. What’s going on? Can anything stop the spread? A new report, Fading Forests III, offers concrete recommendations.

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Lake Yellowstone: Promising News for Native Trout Recovery

Great news on the invasive species front: lake trout in Yellowstone National Park are on the decline, offering a more hopeful future for native fish. A two-year control effort based on the latest fisheries science is paying dividends, researchers say.

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Citizen Science Tuesday: NestWatch

Citizen Science Tuesday connects you to projects that benefit conservation. This week: track the reproductive success of birds and improve understanding of challenges they face with NestWatch. Who doesn’t want to spend time watching baby birds?

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Eurasian Collared Dove: Have You Seen This Bird?

Thirty years ago, non-native Eurasian collared doves were starting to show up in South Florida. Today, this species is being documented across North America. How citizen scientists help document the spread of a non-native species.

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Birders: Report Forest Pests During the Great Backyard Bird Count

The Great Backyard Bird Count is one of the largest citizen science efforts in the world. Learn how participants can expand their impact by reporting invasive forest pests.

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Insect Soup, Deep Ocean Restoration, Twerking Spiders & More

Also in our weekly best of the web: Why “climate change = impending disaster” doesn’t work; drones search for rare pygmy rabbits; and why scientists should talk to reporters.

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Scuba Divers Provide Non-Chemical Weed Control on Wisconsin Lake

Eurasian watermilfoil, meet your worst enemies: scuba divers and snorkelers. A chemical-free, cost-effective method of aquatic weed control offers promising results on a Wisconsin lake.

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Adirondacks Rapid Response: An Invasives Success Story

Too little, too late: that’s often the narrative of invasive species. Not here. Not in the Adirondacks. Early detection and rapid response is making a difference–before invasive plants have the chance to become established.

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The Cooler: Towards a Deeper Conversation on Invasive Species

You know the story: invasive species are bad, bad, bad. But what if that old story is a bit more…complicated? “Ecological hit men” Jeffrey A. Lockwood and Alexandre V. Latchininsky confront an invasive grasshopper on a remote island. And the more they look, the less clear the picture.

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Cloud Computing: A Key Tool in the Fight Against Invasive Species

iMapInvasives is a cloud-based database and mapping system that tracks and monitors invasive species in real-time. It’s also a great way to get citizen-scientists and conservation volunteers involved in the fight against invasive species. And the use of the tool is spreading fast (much like an invasive species does, you might say).

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Forest Dilemmas

Too many deer. Logging one tree to save another. Beavers versus old growth. Welcome to forest conservation in the Anthropocene. Beginning Monday, July 21, join us for a provocative 5-part series exploring the full complexity facing forest conservation in the eastern United States.

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Osprey Cam: Watch Our Wild Neighbors
Watch the ospreys live 24/7 as they nest and raise their young -- and learn more about these fascinating birds from our scientist.

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noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

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Investing in Seagrass
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Creating a Climate-Smart Agriculture
Can farmers globally both adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change? A new paper answers with a definitive yes. But it won't be easy.

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