Tag: Fresh Water

A Sucker (Myth) Is Born Every Minute

Everything you’ve heard about suckers is probably wrong. But could a new generation of anglers and self-described “fish nerds” not only rescue the sucker’s image, but point a new way for freshwater conservation?

Full Article

In Synch: Char & Salmon Migrations in Warming Waters

In Southeast Alaska, salmon are changing their annual migration patterns due to warming waters. Will one of their main predators — Dolly Varden char — adapt to the change?

Full Article

Can Ancient Paddlefish Coexist with Modern Dams?

Paddlefish have been swimming rivers in North America for some 70 million years. But they’ve had difficulty adapting to dams. Can restoring healthy river flows restore paddlefish? An experiment underway at Caddo Lake on the Texas-Louisiana border hopes to find answers.

Full Article

Can Floodplain Forest Restoration Reduce the Gulf’s Dead Zone?

Can restoring floodplain forests in Indiana make a difference in reducing the Gulf of Mexico’s “dead zone”? A new study shows a great return on investment in using natural habitat to reduce nitrogen pollution.

Full Article

Lake Yellowstone: Promising News for Native Trout Recovery

Great news on the invasive species front: lake trout in Yellowstone National Park are on the decline, offering a more hopeful future for native fish. A two-year control effort based on the latest fisheries science is paying dividends, researchers say.

Full Article

Imagine Rivers Full of Migrating Fish

Make no mistake: when it comes to migratory fish, sometimes science requires the art of imagination. Conservation planner Josh Royte celebrates World Fish Migration Day and the hope offered by river restoration.

Full Article

Pupfish: Conserving a Mojave Desert Survivor

Sure, desert pupfish are tough. Hot water temperatures? They thrive in it. Creeks saltier than the ocean? No problem. But now pupfish face a bigger challenge — people and their need for lots of water.

Full Article

Go with the Flow: Using Flow Experiments to Guide River Management

The recent news of a “pulse flow” in the Lower Colorado River has highlighted a steadily growing trend in freshwater conservation along “working” rivers – restoring elements of natural flow regimes. A new paper reviews such flow experiments and their effects on ecological restoration.

Full Article

Sustainable Hydropower: Are Small Dams Really Better for the Environment?

When it comes to dams, small is often considered beautiful. But should small hydropower projects get a free pass? Can such dams actually be tiny but terrible? Freshwater scientist Jeff Opperman takes a look at the realities of sustainable hydropower.

Full Article

Beyond the Power Struggle: The Science and Values of Sustainable Hydropower

Fighting dams is in the environmental movement’s DNA. But is it time to change? Freshwater scientist Jeff Opperman argues that science-based collaboration offers a better future for rivers and fish — and the people who depend on them.

Full Article

Giulio Boccaletti: What Scientific Idea is Ready for Retirement?

In hydrology, a concept known as stationarity allows us to define events using time statistics, like the “one in a hundred years flood.” Dr. Giulio Boccaletti argues that it’s time to retire this concept.

Full Article

Conserving Lake Trout Among the Philosophers

Can well-managed lakes in the Adirondacks provide important refuges for lake trout in the face of climate change? That’s the focus of a new intensive research effort being conducted at Follensby Pond, where philosophers once pondered life’s mysteries.

Full Article

10 Fish Conservation Success Stories to Celebrate

Looking for a good fish story? We look back at some of the year’s best conservation results for fisheries, from alligator gar reintroduction to salmon recovery, with a side dish of fish and chimps.

Full Article

Scuba Divers Provide Non-Chemical Weed Control on Wisconsin Lake

Eurasian watermilfoil, meet your worst enemies: scuba divers and snorkelers. A chemical-free, cost-effective method of aquatic weed control offers promising results on a Wisconsin lake.

Full Article

The Limits of Science Communications: Why Do People Live in Floodplains?

Science can play a role in informing one’s beliefs. But can it convince someone not to live in a floodplain? Our blogger tracks down the owner of this home destroyed by a flood and asks: Is it worth it?

Full Article


Diverse Conservation

Call for Inclusive Conservation
Join Heather Tallis in a call to increase the diversity of voices and values in the conservation debate.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is edited by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications, and managed by Lisa Feldkamp, an American Council of Learned Societies fellow with the TNC science communications team. Email us your feedback.

Innovative Science

Infrared Sage Grouse Count
The challenge: find a chicken-sized bird in a million-acre expanse of rugged canyons & bad roads. Infrared video to the rescue.

Wildlife Videos In Infrared
Infrared enables us to see minor variations in temperature. See how this technology is revolutionizing conservation science.

Nature As Normal
TNC Lead Scientist Heather Tallis is researching how to make people see nature as critical to life through three lenses: education, water and poverty.

Latest Tweets from @nature_brains

Categories