Tag: fishing

Shoot Out the Lights: Science, Hydropower & Reality on the Mekong

The standard story: big dams disrupt the livelihoods of rural villages. But many communities welcome development; Can conservation minimize hydropower impacts?

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Conserving Lake Trout Among the Philosophers

Can well-managed lakes in the Adirondacks provide important refuges for lake trout in the face of climate change? That’s the focus of a new intensive research effort being conducted at Follensby Pond, where philosophers once pondered life’s mysteries.

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10 Fish Conservation Success Stories to Celebrate

Looking for a good fish story? We look back at some of the year’s best conservation results for fisheries, from alligator gar reintroduction to salmon recovery, with a side dish of fish and chimps.

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Lose the Memory, Lose the Fish

A dead river runs through it? We’ve come to accept our current, degraded rivers as normal, even though they once held almost-incomprehensible numbers of migratory fish. Can ecological history be a first step in reclaiming our memory and our fish?

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Restoring Coastal Wetlands: Complex Problems Need Multiple Solutions

Dredging or diversions: which is best for restoring Louisiana’s coastal wetlands? The debate is passionate, but Bryan Piazza says it overlooks the reality of restoration: we need both.

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Research Results: If You Restore It, Will Pike Come?

It’s well known that some migratory fish species, like salmon, are able to trace their way back to the stream where they were born. However, conservationists have no idea if this is the case for hundreds of other fish species.

Do pike return to spawn in the streams where they were born, a la salmon?

Not necessarily, at least in the Green Bay watershed. If there’s suitable habitat, pike will find it and spawn. That’s the central finding of research conducted by the University of Wisconsin’s Pete McIntyre and Dan Oele.

This result may sound like a let-down, but in reality it’s a relief for conservationists in the Green Bay area. The Nature Conservancy and other conservation groups are focused on restoring streams for pike and other fish, but the best methods to accomplish that goal remain uncertain. If pike returned to their natal streams to spawn, they may never find a restored stream even if it contained suitable habitat.

That’s not the case, which is good news for conservation efforts.

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New Study: Marine Protection Goals Are on Target, But Still Not Enough

According to a new report led by Nature Conservancy scientists and policy experts, the number of marine protected areas (MPAs) has increased fivefold in the last 10 years and the world is actually on track to meet its goal of protecting 10% of the oceans by 2020.

Sounds like something to shout from the rooftops, right? Not quite, say the authors. Instead, they want the marine conservation community to see this as an opportunity for reassessment: A call-to-action to step up and look beyond the numbers.

“It’s certainly progress and we should celebrate that,” says Mark Spalding, a Conservancy marine scientist and lead author on the report. “But there’s a lot of nuance behind these targets. More than that, is 10% really what we should be fixated on?”

The study — developed in conjunction with the UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Centre and published in the Ocean Yearbook — assessed the state of ocean protection efforts to date and provides recommendations for how to achieve real success for the future. The authors reviewed 10,280 MPAs, covering 8.3 million square kilometers or 2.3% of the world’s ocean area, and found:

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