Tag: fisheries

Power to the People: Community Based Marine Conservation

Local communities are working together to manage their coastal marine resources. Learn how Pate Marine Community Conservancy is revamping marine conservation.

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Protect Parrotfish, Protect the Reef?

A recent report argues that the path to saving Caribbean reefs starts with protecting parrotfish. That’s undeniably an important step, but that alone won’t save the reefs. A conversation with NatureNet Fellow Stephanie Wear on parrotfish and reef health.

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A Hackathon for Fish Conservation

Hackathons have swept through the tech industry, and have been used to quickly find innovative solutions in software, gaming and apps. Could a hackathon ever be used to solve a conservation challenge?

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Lake Yellowstone: Promising News for Native Trout Recovery

Great news on the invasive species front: lake trout in Yellowstone National Park are on the decline, offering a more hopeful future for native fish. A two-year control effort based on the latest fisheries science is paying dividends, researchers say.

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Go with the Flow: Using Flow Experiments to Guide River Management

The recent news of a “pulse flow” in the Lower Colorado River has highlighted a steadily growing trend in freshwater conservation along “working” rivers – restoring elements of natural flow regimes. A new paper reviews such flow experiments and their effects on ecological restoration.

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Sea of Cortez: Conserving the World’s Aquarium

Jacques Cousteau called it the “world’s aquarium”: a place of flying mobula rays, frolicking sea lions and colorful reef fish. Marine scientist Alison Green travels to the Sea of Cortez to see the biological wonders for herself, and ponders the future of this special place.

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Sustainable Hydropower: Are Small Dams Really Better for the Environment?

When it comes to dams, small is often considered beautiful. But should small hydropower projects get a free pass? Can such dams actually be tiny but terrible? Freshwater scientist Jeff Opperman takes a look at the realities of sustainable hydropower.

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Beyond the Power Struggle: The Science and Values of Sustainable Hydropower

Fighting dams is in the environmental movement’s DNA. But is it time to change? Freshwater scientist Jeff Opperman argues that science-based collaboration offers a better future for rivers and fish — and the people who depend on them.

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The Mahi-Mahi & The Map: Digital Storytelling for Science

How can a scientist convey a complex and even contentious topic like marine spatial planning to non-specialist audiences? Shawn Margles looks to digital storytelling to convey the emotion behind the science.

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Conserving Lake Trout Among the Philosophers

Can well-managed lakes in the Adirondacks provide important refuges for lake trout in the face of climate change? That’s the focus of a new intensive research effort being conducted at Follensby Pond, where philosophers once pondered life’s mysteries.

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10 Fish Conservation Success Stories to Celebrate

Looking for a good fish story? We look back at some of the year’s best conservation results for fisheries, from alligator gar reintroduction to salmon recovery, with a side dish of fish and chimps.

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Lose the Memory, Lose the Fish

A dead river runs through it? We’ve come to accept our current, degraded rivers as normal, even though they once held almost-incomprehensible numbers of migratory fish. Can ecological history be a first step in reclaiming our memory and our fish?

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A Breakthrough for Data-Poor Fisheries Starts in Palau

Find out how a new technique piloted in Palau by The Nature Conservancy could help solve one of the world’s greatest challenges in fisheries management — a simple, low-cost method for assessing fish stocks.

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Restoring Coastal Wetlands: Complex Problems Need Multiple Solutions

Dredging or diversions: which is best for restoring Louisiana’s coastal wetlands? The debate is passionate, but Bryan Piazza says it overlooks the reality of restoration: we need both.

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Results: Great News for Shad

Standing on the bow of the boat, Steve Herrington exuded the excited energy of a kid reeling in his first fish. Or perhaps a more scientific version of the Crocodile Hunter, bubbling with intensity. Net in hand, he scooped up shad — a migratory fish species — quickly examining them before passing them off to fellow researchers.

As covered in yesterday’s blog, last year I spent a day with Steve on Florida’s Apalachicola River looking at Alabama shad, a fish that researchers hoped would benefit by a practice known as conservation locking—basically allowing fish to pass through dams by using the same lock system that enables ships to pass.

Herrington was then director of freshwater programs for The Nature Conservancy’s Florida program (he now holds the same position with Missouri). At the time, conservation locking on the Apalachicola seemed to hold great promise for shad, a migratory species. He estimated that conservation locking could result in a returning population of 60,000 to 75,000 shad, indicating a steady increase.

Fast forward a year later. Herrington is on the phone, and that same infectious enthusiasm is literally bubbling over. “Great news!” he exclaims.

And indeed, his research has yielded surprising results. Those initial estimates of 60,000 shad? Way low. Estimates now showed a 122,000 fish increase, with as many as 280,000 total shad now in the system.

“We can now confidently say that conservation locking works, and we’re seeing a substantial bump in the population,” Herrington says. “I don’t know that there are any other data out there that so convincingly demonstrates such effectiveness.”

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Diverse Conservation

Call for Inclusive Conservation
Join Heather Tallis in a call to increase the diversity of voices and values in the conservation debate.

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TNC Lead Scientist Heather Tallis is researching how to make people see nature as critical to life through three lenses: education, water and poverty.

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