Tag: Fish

10 Fish Conservation Success Stories to Celebrate

Looking for a good fish story? We look back at some of the year’s best conservation results for fisheries, from alligator gar reintroduction to salmon recovery, with a side dish of fish and chimps.

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Scuba Divers Provide Non-Chemical Weed Control on Wisconsin Lake

Eurasian watermilfoil, meet your worst enemies: scuba divers and snorkelers. A chemical-free, cost-effective method of aquatic weed control offers promising results on a Wisconsin lake.

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Lose the Memory, Lose the Fish

A dead river runs through it? We’ve come to accept our current, degraded rivers as normal, even though they once held almost-incomprehensible numbers of migratory fish. Can ecological history be a first step in reclaiming our memory and our fish?

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A Breakthrough for Data-Poor Fisheries Starts in Palau

Find out how a new technique piloted in Palau by The Nature Conservancy could help solve one of the world’s greatest challenges in fisheries management — a simple, low-cost method for assessing fish stocks.

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Where the River Meets the Road: Reconnecting Adirondack Brook Trout Streams

Road culverts may not be sexy. But in the Adirondacks, simple fixes in culvert design could reconnect miles of habitat for brook trout, one of the most iconic fishes of eastern streams, and prevent flooding during severe storms.

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Restoring Coastal Wetlands: Complex Problems Need Multiple Solutions

Dredging or diversions: which is best for restoring Louisiana’s coastal wetlands? The debate is passionate, but Bryan Piazza says it overlooks the reality of restoration: we need both.

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Quick Study: When Can Eating More Fish Actually Benefit Fish Populations and Fishermen?

What effect does consumer demand have on fish populations? If you assumed it would be negative, this case study from Nature Conservancy scientist Sheila Walsh and others might make you re-think your position.

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Oceans and Climate Change: Protecting the “Invisible”

Coral bleaching, increasing storms, the loss of polar bears: many impacts of climate change are already vivid in our minds. We naturally worry about the things we can see. Huge waves and the loss of big fish and colorful corals get our attention.

But what about things we can’t see, like the tiny creatures called plankton? They are also poised for dramatic changes.

A recent dive in the sapphire waters of the Caribbean offers a close encounter with plankton. While most of my dive buddies hurry to reach the bottom, I linger as I usually do, pondering the “blue” and looking out for the visible and the invisible.

Suddenly, clouds of tiny filaments come sharply into focus. It’s blue-green algae–Trichodesmium–a type of phytoplankton that plays an important role in these nutrient-poor waters. They essentially break gaseous nitrogen’s tough triple bond and convert it into a form other phytoplankton can feed on.

What would these waters look like without them?

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Salmon Cam Returns

We’re pleased to return Salmon Cam, a live view of spawning Chinook and coho salmon and steelhead trout.

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noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is managed by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications, and edited by Bob Lalasz, its director of science communications. Email us your feedback.

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