Tag: ecotourism

How to Green Birding’s ‘Big Year’

In a “Big Year,” birders race to rack up as many bird species as possible, often at a great economic and environmental cost. The Big Green Year changes that.

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Birds, Birding and Economic Gains on a Restored Coast

When the Nature Conservancy purchased land in Cape May they planned to help birds. The unexpected benefits? Increased tourism and storm mitigation.

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Alligator Rescue on the Border

The alligator was trapped and destined to die a slow death: time for a rescue operation. An unexpected twist at one of the most biodiverse nature reserves in the United States, the National Butterfly Center in Mission, Texas.

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Canary in the Cornfield: Why the Fuss about Monarchs?

Everyone is talking about the record low count of monarchs at their overwintering site in Mexico, but what is really happening to these butterflies and why does it matter?

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Traveling Naturalist: Spotting Wild Jaguars

What naturalist wouldn’t want to see a wild jaguar? There’s one place where observing these big cats isn’t a quixotic quest, but a realistic expectation. A journey to the extensive wetlands and rivers of Brazil’s Pantanal.

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Meet the Ocellated Turkey

Put aside thoughts of the Thanksgiving bird. There’s another turkey: a colorful bird that haunts Mayan ruins. Meet the Meleagris ocellata, the ocellated turkey.

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Shade Coffee: Not Just for the Birds

When it comes to coffee, we not only need to think about who grows the bean, but also how and where it is grown. Shade coffee is worth the investment, says Tim Boucher.

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Indonesia’s First Shark Sanctuary – Raja Ampat Leads the Way

This week has without a doubt been the highlight of my career as a marine conservationist. And, as someone who has had a long-term love affair with the world’s oceans, it’s been a life highlight as well.

On 20 February 2013, the Raja Ampat government officially announced that it has declared its entire 4 million hectares of coastal and marine waters a shark sanctuary.

This means that all harvesting of sharks is now prohibited in its waters. In addition, the sanctuary also gives full protection to a number ecologically and economically important ocean species, such as manta rays, dugongs, whales, turtles, dolphins and ornamental fish species.

Why is this important and why should we care?

Well, sharks have a really hard time in our oceans. Beyond the often over-amplified fear people have of sharks, they are also targeted for their high-priced fins or are caught accidently in fishing nets.

It is estimated that at least 26-73 million sharks are killed each year globally, mostly for their fins. Shark finning is one of the cruelest practices around—it involves throwing a still-breathing shark overboard with its fins cut off and its body bleeding into the water.

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Enjoy Osprey Cam Live!

The Ospreys Are Back!
Live views, 24/7, of an Alabama osprey nest. Record your observations and ask our ecologist about what you’re seeing.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is edited by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications, and managed by Lisa Feldkamp, an American Council of Learned Societies fellow with the TNC science communications team. Email us your feedback.

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