Tag: citizen science

Citizen Science Tuesday: oldWeather

Citizen Science Tuesday connects you to projects that benefit conservation. This week: take a voyage with the mariners of oldWeather and improve data for climate models.

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Citizen Science Tuesday: NestWatch

Citizen Science Tuesday connects you to projects that benefit conservation. This week: track the reproductive success of birds and improve understanding of challenges they face with NestWatch. Who doesn’t want to spend time watching baby birds?

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Citizen Science Tuesday: Project BudBurst

Our new series connects you to citizen science projects that benefit conservation. First up: record when trees bloom and wildflowers blossom to help Project BudBurst track the effects of climate change.

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Plight of the Bumble Bee: Conserving Imperiled Native Pollinators

You’ve probably heard about the loss of honey bees. But did you know native bumble bees face even more alarming declines? These vital pollinators are disappearing due to pesticides and habitat loss. You can make a difference — right in your backyard.

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Eurasian Collared Dove: Have You Seen This Bird?

Thirty years ago, non-native Eurasian collared doves were starting to show up in South Florida. Today, this species is being documented across North America. How citizen scientists help document the spread of a non-native species.

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Birders: Report Forest Pests During the Great Backyard Bird Count

The Great Backyard Bird Count is one of the largest citizen science efforts in the world. Learn how participants can expand their impact by reporting invasive forest pests.

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Mad Men Go Falcon Trapping

Bird conservation, 1950s style. Blogger Joe Smith looks back at the unusual techniques used by bird banders, at a time when peregrine falcons faced a bleak and uncertain future.

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How Will the Polar Vortex Affect Wildlife?

The “polar vortex” that is bringing frigid temperatures to much of the United States is miserable for people. But how do wild animals cope with these extreme conditions?

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Snowy Owl Invasion!

The snowy owls are here — especially if you live on the east coast! Birder extraordinaire Tim Boucher provides the latest on this natural phenomenon — and how you can see this dramatic bird near you.

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Camera Trap Chronicles: Wildlife of North Idaho’s Working Forests

Grizzly bears and moose and flying squirrels, oh my. Check out the critters captured via camera trap images on Conservancy projects in North Idaho.

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Scuba Divers Provide Non-Chemical Weed Control on Wisconsin Lake

Eurasian watermilfoil, meet your worst enemies: scuba divers and snorkelers. A chemical-free, cost-effective method of aquatic weed control offers promising results on a Wisconsin lake.

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Theodore Roosevelt: The Birding Citizen-Scientist-in-Chief

Theodore Roosevelt not only created national parks and wildlife refuges, he also was an avid naturalist and a lifelong student of science. Our blogger looks at his “yard list” of birds spotted around the White House and compares it to the birds found there today.

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NASA Radar Helps Conservationists Study Songbird Migrations

NASA radar technology can detect the size, shape and speed of individual raindrops. It can also, it turns out, detect individual birds. Welcome to a powerful new tool in understanding songbird migration being deployed in eastern Maryland and Virginia.

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Dragonfly Migration: A Mystery Citizen Scientists Can Help Solve

A dragonfly holds the record for the longest insect migration. And yet dragonfly migration remains a poorly understood ecological phenomenon. Take note, citizen scientists: your observations can contribute significantly to our understanding of the species, and it’s importance to conservation. Break out your field guide and look around city park or backyard.

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Citizen Science: Survey Katydids in Your Neighborhood

That night music you hear coming from the trees? At least in part, that’s coming from katydids. Despite their ubiquity, very little is known about these charismatic critters. But you can help. Grab your smart phone and head into your neighborhood for a katydid census! Blogger Jon Fisher gets you started.

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Osprey Cam: Watch Our Wild Neighbors
Watch the ospreys live 24/7 as they nest and raise their young -- and learn more about these fascinating birds from our scientist.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is managed by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications at the Conservancy, and edited by Bob Lalasz, its director of science communications. Email us your feedback.

Editors’ Choice

Where Have The Monarchs Gone?
Monarch butterflies are disappearing. What's going on? Is there anything we can do about it?

North America's Greatest Bird Spectacle?
The Platte River is alive with 500,000 sandhill cranes. Learn how you can catch the action--even from your computer.

The Strangest Wildlife Rescue?
Meet the animal that was saved from extinction because someone broke a wildlife law.

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