Tag: Alaska

10 Fish Conservation Success Stories to Celebrate

Looking for a good fish story? We look back at some of the year’s best conservation results for fisheries, from alligator gar reintroduction to salmon recovery, with a side dish of fish and chimps.

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Lose the Memory, Lose the Fish

A dead river runs through it? We’ve come to accept our current, degraded rivers as normal, even though they once held almost-incomprehensible numbers of migratory fish. Can ecological history be a first step in reclaiming our memory and our fish?

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Natural Intersection: Understanding and Conserving Alaska’s Estuaries

Meet the estuary: where three powerful realms–river, ocean and land–meet. A new paper by Conservancy scientists classifies this important habitat, and helps conservationists better protect estuaries vital for both people and wildlife.

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People of the Salmon: Haida Tribe Defends Salmon with Science in Alaska

The Haida community on Prince of Wales Island, Alaska, have long considered themselves “people of the salmon.” They rely on the fish for their food and culture. Now community members are being trained to become scientists. Their assessments could help get their streams protected under Alaska state law.

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Seeing the Forest for the Flying Squirrels

Flying squirrels glide through the trees with the greatest of ease — but only if they have a big enough patch of forest.

These little squirrels – with flappy skin between their hands and feet that enables them to glide effortlessly from tree to tree – can’t scamper around much on the ground. They need a forest, and preferably a diverse one.

But just how much forest does a flying squirrel need?

That was the focus of research recently published in the journal Ecological Indicators by Nature Conservancy ecologist Colin Shanley.

The information he learned about these small mammals’ habitat needs provides more data to help better manage an Alaska’s Tongass National Forest. Forest managers are transitioning from historically large-scale clearcutting to local, small-scale, sustainable harvest of primarily young-growth stands in previously harvested areas.

Figuring out what wildlife need to survive is an important part of the forest management program.

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Forest Dilemmas

Too many deer. Logging one tree to save another. Beavers versus old growth. Welcome to forest conservation in the Anthropocene. Beginning Monday, July 21, join us for a provocative 5-part series exploring the full complexity facing forest conservation in the eastern United States.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is managed by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications, and edited by Bob Lalasz, its director of science communications. Email us your feedback.

Innovative Science

Investing in Seagrass
Marine scientists and fishers alike know that grass beds are valuable as nursery habitat. A new Conservancy-funded study puts a number to it.

Drones Aid Bird Conservation
How can California conservationists accurately count thousands of cranes? Enter a new tool in bird monitoring: the drone.

Creating a Climate-Smart Agriculture
Can farmers globally both adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change? A new paper answers with a definitive yes. But it won't be easy.

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