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Smog blankets Houston, Texas. Ozone — together with fine particulates — contributes to smog formation. A new study documents the viability of reforestation for ozone control. Photo credit: Flicker user Rick Kempel under a Creative Commons 2.0 license.
Western fence lizard. Photo: Wikimedia user Calibas under a Creative Commons license.
A common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). Photo by Flickr user Marcio Ramalho through a Creative Commons license.
The Bangweulu Wetlands ecosystem in northern Zambia covers a large area of great biodiversity. This grassy floodplain encompasses high value terrestrial and freshwater habitats with relatively low management and opportunity costs. Photo credit Tim Boucher/TNC
Emma Marris.
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Sanderlings and a sandpiper at Stone Harbor, NJ. Photo by Flickr user hjhipster through a Creative Commons license.
A Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis). Photo by Flickr user Willem v Strien through a Creative Commons license.
Woodpeckers pound their heads repeatedly with no ill effects. What can we learn from them? Photo credit:  Flickr user Andrew Morffew via a Creative Commons 2.0 license
An argument. Photo by Flickr user Dmitris Papazimouris through a Creative Commons license.
Water, water everywhere -- but it's all covered in algae. Photo: © John Delmotte
A gull takes off along the Oregon Coast. Photo by Flickr user Ricardo Wang through a Creative Commons license.
Roosevelt elk can often be seen at California's redwood state parks. Photo: Matt Miller/TNC
A "zombie ant." Photo: Wikimedia user Nirajdude under a Creative Commons license.
Mr. Atwasi Swabir, Chairman of the Pate Marine Community Conservancy (PMCC), examines an angelfish caught by a spear fisherman off the Kenyan coast. Photo credit: Alison Green/TNC.
A cow is fitted with a GPS collar to monitor its hourly movements on the Chippewa Prairie. Photo: © Joe Blastick/TNC

Diverse Conservation

Call for Inclusive Conservation
Join Heather Tallis in a call to increase the diversity of voices and values in the conservation debate.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is managed by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications, and edited by Bob Lalasz, its director of science communications. Email us your feedback.

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Nature As Normal
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