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Image credit: OlBrug/Flickr through a Creative Commons license.
© Bridget Besaw
Australian Tree Fern growing on a cliff in Hawaii.
An alligator in trouble. Photo; © Paul Queneau, pqphoto.net
Hydras regenerate many new bodies from just a few cells -- even after being ground to bits. Think Phantasia...or Terminator. Live Green Hydra, photographed by Marc Perkins, shared through a Creative Commons license on Flickr.
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Photo: © Scott Copeland
A greater yellowlegs at Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge. Photo: © Dave Spier
Plains spadefoot (Spea bombifrons). Photo by Flickr user Andy Teucher through a Creative Commons license.
Sabal palm seeds collected from coyote scat are cleaned at the preserve. Photo: Max Pons/TNC
Tiger close-up. Photo by Flickr user vishwanath Hawargi through a Creative Commons license.
A biologist prepares a paddlefish for release. TNC file photo
The Salve Paccha Aquaduct, which transports water from Cayambe Coca to Quito, runs through the paramos landscape at the foot of Ecuador's Andean range.  Photo credit: ©Bridget Besaw/TNC
A map showing soil type and a counts of plant species observed in various areas. Screenshot from the Project BudBurst page of FieldScope.
Farming-in-Indiana
The Asian common toad -- newly arrived in Madagascar -- is toxic to many native species of predators. Though the newcomers are not yet widespread, researchers urge quick action to prevent an ecological crisis. Photo credit: Thomas Brown/Flickr

This Week on Cool Green Science: Change & The Eastern U.S. Forest

Too many deer. Logging one tree to save another. Beavers versus old growth. Welcome to forest conservation in the Anthropocene. Beginning Monday, July 21, join us for a provocative 5-part series exploring the full complexity facing forest conservation in the eastern United States.

Featured Content

Osprey Cam: Watch Our Wild Neighbors
Watch the ospreys live 24/7 as they nest and raise their young -- and learn more about these fascinating birds from our scientist.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is managed by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications, and edited by Bob Lalasz, its director of science communications. Email us your feedback.

Innovative Science

Investing in Seagrass
Marine scientists and fishers alike know that grass beds are valuable as nursery habitat. A new Conservancy-funded study puts a number to it.

Drones Aid Bird Conservation
How can California conservationists accurately count thousands of cranes? Enter a new tool in bird monitoring: the drone.

Creating a Climate-Smart Agriculture
Can farmers globally both adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change? A new paper answers with a definitive yes. But it won't be easy.

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