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Mr. Atwasi Swabir, Chairman of the Pate Marine Community Conservancy (PMCC), examines an angelfish caught by a spear fisherman off the Kenyan coast. Photo credit: Alison Green/TNC.
A cow is fitted with a GPS collar to monitor its hourly movements on the Chippewa Prairie. Photo: © Joe Blastick/TNC
Jellyfish on the beach. Photo by Flickr user Peter Roome through a Creative Commons license.
Chocolate flowers. Photo: Matt Miller/TNC
Sun flickers through a grove of aspens at Kenosha Pass, Colorado. These iconic trees have been disappearing around the west. Photo credit: Flickr user Pat Gaines via Creative Commons 2.0 license.
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Many New York and New Jersey coastal communities experienced severe flooding during Hurricane Sandy. Neighbors of the Cape May Meadows Preserve incurred little damage -- thanks, in part, to the restoration. Photo credit: Flickr user Matthew Kraus via Creative Commons 2.0 license.
Piping plovers. Photo by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
A river otter collects grass to build a nest. Photo courtesy of the River Otter Ecology Project.
A quadcopter drone flies over a red mangrove forest. Photo: © Tim Calver
Apparently, great white sharks don't take kindly to paparazzi, but UAV camera takes a licking and keeps on returning valuable data. Photo credit: Courtesy of Discovery Channel and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Image courtesy of A Dash of Scrapbooking.
Dunlin flock flying above flooded rice field. Photo © Drew Kelly/TNC.
Fireflies in the Catskills. Photo by Flickr user s58y through a Creative Commons license.
A long-billed curlew among Flat Ranch Preserve's wildflowers. Photo: Megan Cereda-Grover/TNC
Last summer's heat wave in the upper midwest took a toll on populations of native trout, which don't survive water temperatures above 77 degrees F. Photo credit: Flickr user Al_HikesAZ, via a Creative Commons 2.0 license.

Forest Dilemmas

Too many deer. Logging one tree to save another. Beavers versus old growth. Welcome to forest conservation in the 21st century. Join us for a provocative 5-part series exploring the full complexity facing forest conservation in the eastern United States.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is managed by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications, and edited by Bob Lalasz, its director of science communications. Email us your feedback.

Innovative Science

Investing in Seagrass
Marine scientists and fishers alike know that grass beds are valuable as nursery habitat. A new Conservancy-funded study puts a number to it.

Drones Aid Bird Conservation
How can California conservationists accurately count thousands of cranes? Enter a new tool in bird monitoring: the drone.

Creating a Climate-Smart Agriculture
Can farmers globally both adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change? A new paper answers with a definitive yes. But it won't be easy.

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