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Giant reed (Arundo donax) grows to 30 feet, spreads by rhizomes and displaces many native plants. It is simultaneously eligible for biofuel subsidies and a target of biological control efforts. Photo credit: Flickr user Forest and Kim Starr via a Creative Commons 2.0 license.
A rainbow parrotfish in the Caribbean. Photo: © Ken Marks
Vulnerability of a society is calculated as
the sum of susceptibility,
lack of coping capacities
and lack of adaptive capacities. Map shows vulnerability of 139 coastal nations from Coasts at Risk Report, 2014.
Photo: Matt Miller/TNC
A fritillary butterfly that has been placed in a plastic cup to be identified. The butterflies are quickly released unharmed. Photo by Tony Pocewicz.
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Getting ready for Fishackathon 2014. Photo by Matt Merrifield.
Beavers do a lot of ecological good. But what hapens when they become too abundant? Photo: © Kent Mason
Although blue whale hunting has been banned since xxx, populations are not increasing. The largest tracking study so far shows that whale-ship collisions are partly responsible.
Harvesting ash at Woodbourne. Photo: George C. Gress/TNC
The Conservancy's George Gress and Sarah Johnson tag hemlock trees at Woodbourne Preserve. Photo: Mike Eckley/TNC
Quality deer management is about more than producing trophy bucks. Photo: © Kent Mason
Does logging have any place in a "pristine" eastern forest? Photo: George C. Gress/TNC
Young sea turtles hatch from eggs almost simultaneously. New research suggests they coordinate hatching through sounds emitted while still in the eggs.
Photo credit: Flickr user Terry Ross through a Creative Commons 2.0 license.
The Argentine black and white tegu -- which grows to over 4 feet and east the eggs of other reptiles -- is becoming an invasive pest in Florida. Photo credit: © 2013 Karine Aigner and Ken Geiger for The Nature Conservancy
William Housty collects grizzly bear fur for genetic analysis. Photo: © Mark Godfrey/TNC

Forest Dilemmas

Too many deer. Logging one tree to save another. Beavers versus old growth. Welcome to forest conservation in the Anthropocene. Beginning Monday, July 21, join us for a provocative 5-part series exploring the full complexity facing forest conservation in the eastern United States.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is managed by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications, and edited by Bob Lalasz, its director of science communications. Email us your feedback.

Innovative Science

Investing in Seagrass
Marine scientists and fishers alike know that grass beds are valuable as nursery habitat. A new Conservancy-funded study puts a number to it.

Drones Aid Bird Conservation
How can California conservationists accurately count thousands of cranes? Enter a new tool in bird monitoring: the drone.

Creating a Climate-Smart Agriculture
Can farmers globally both adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change? A new paper answers with a definitive yes. But it won't be easy.

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