Category: Science

Cool Green Science: Year in Review 2013

Thanks for making Cool Green Science one of the world’s most-read conservation science blogs — in just its first year! Here’s a look back at our most popular stories from 2013.

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Remembering Alfred Russel Wallace

Remembering Alfred Russel Wallace, co-discoverer of evolution and conservation great, on the centennial of his passing.

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New Science: Time to Step Away from the Ecological Footprint?

How sustainably are we managing Earth? A new study co-authored by Conservancy scientist Peter Kareiva says we can’t even answer the question with the most commonly used metric.

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Star Spangled Science: Bouncing Back from Hurricane Sandy

Wanted: a PhD who can win a bar fight. That might seem like an unusual job qualification, but it came in handy when developing science-based responses to Superstorm Sandy.

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Shade Coffee: Not Just for the Birds

When it comes to coffee, we not only need to think about who grows the bean, but also how and where it is grown. Shade coffee is worth the investment, says Tim Boucher.

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Meet the NatureNet Fellows: Wilfred Odadi

He’s completed “some of the most detailed and extensive foraging ecology ever done on cattle in Africa.” Meet NatureNet Fellow Wilfred Odadi, and learn what his research means for people, rangeland management and wildlife in northern Kenya.

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Can Forest Carbon Markets Provide for a 40,000-Year-Old Culture?

That’s a key question being answered by the Conservancy and partners as they work to protect the land of the Hadza, who have hunted and lived in this region for at least 40,000 years.

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Natural Intersection: Understanding and Conserving Alaska’s Estuaries

Meet the estuary: where three powerful realms–river, ocean and land–meet. A new paper by Conservancy scientists classifies this important habitat, and helps conservationists better protect estuaries vital for both people and wildlife.

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Beyond Magic: Why SNAP Can Help Us Solve Wicked Problems

The new Science for Nature and People collaborative has unprecedented power to address some of the world’s wicked problems, says Conservancy Chief Scientist and SNAP Acting Director Peter Kareiva.

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The World Famous Shrew-Eating Trout: An Update

We’ve been inundated with questions about the shrew-eating trout featured in a blog published earlier this month. Get your questions answered, and more. (Including a fish that ate something even more disturbing).

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Is China’s Coastal Aquaculture Production a House of Cards?

No country exports more shrimp than China. Yet how sustainable is shrimp aquaculture production in China? Conservancy senior social scientist Craig Leisher looks to the literature for answers, and what he finds isn’t promising.

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Dragonfly Migration: A Mystery Citizen Scientists Can Help Solve

A dragonfly holds the record for the longest insect migration. And yet dragonfly migration remains a poorly understood ecological phenomenon. Take note, citizen scientists: your observations can contribute significantly to our understanding of the species, and it’s importance to conservation. Break out your field guide and look around city park or backyard.

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The Cooler: Bob Paine Looks Forward

Legendary ecologist Bob Paine — inventor of the “keystone species” concept as well as the “kick-it-and-see” school of ecology — gives a wonderful interview to the website Biodiverse Perspectives. Will nature become so diminished and boring in the future, he wonders, that ecology will go extinct?

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Quick Study: Counterinsurgency, Anyone? How Conservation Can Better Prepare for ‘Wicked’ Problems

Conservation still uses a straightforward, engineering mindset that’s inadequate for tackling today’s complex problems, argues a new paper from Conservancy scientist Eddie Game. So what can we learn from counter-insurgency, business, psychology and other fields?

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Quick Study: Why Conservation Science Needs to Get Interdisciplinary–and Why It Hasn’t

Being multidisciplinary isn’t enough for today’s conservation science, says a new study by Conservancy scientist Sheila Walsh Reddy and others–we need to get out of our siloes in order to help solve the world’s most pressing problems. But being truly interdisciplinary can be costly and difficult.

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Diverse Conservation

Call for Inclusive Conservation
Join Heather Tallis in a call to increase the diversity of voices and values in the conservation debate.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is managed by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications, and edited by Bob Lalasz, its director of science communications. Email us your feedback.

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Wildlife Videos In Infrared
Infrared enables us to see minor variations in temperature. See how this technology is revolutionizing conservation science.

Nature As Normal
TNC Lead Scientist Heather Tallis is researching how to make people see nature as critical to life through three lenses: education, water and poverty.

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