Category: Science

CSI Channel Islands: Can the Island Scrub-jay Help to Think about Climate Change?

Solving the mystery of Santa Rosa’s island scrub-jays could refine thinking on how to manage vulnerable species under climate change.

Full Article

Do the Rumble-Rump with Peacock Spiders

Meet the tiny spider with one of the wildest mating displays in the animal kingdom. Jon Fisher takes you into the realm of the peacock spider and its unbelievable “dance moves.”

Full Article

Spiders Go Fishing, Old Trees Dwindle & Icebergs Scrape Bottom

Also in our best of the web: group discounts on solar panels, Chilean dams halted, monster jellyfish and spiders with personality.

Full Article

Urban Water Footprint: Extensive and Expensive

A new global database of urban water sources developed by the Conservancy’s Rob McDonald highlights just how far water travels and how much it can cost to get it there.

Full Article

Can Floodplain Forest Restoration Reduce the Gulf’s Dead Zone?

Can restoring floodplain forests in Indiana make a difference in reducing the Gulf of Mexico’s “dead zone”? A new study shows a great return on investment in using natural habitat to reduce nitrogen pollution.

Full Article

On Understanding Varying Approaches among Conservation Professionals

How do conservation professionals focus their decisions? A new article in the journal Human Ecology finds surprising answers — and a fundamental difference in conservation approaches.

Full Article

Accelerating the Pace of Conservation Science

A paper co-authored by the Nature Conservancy’s chief scientist reflects how much conservation science has changed in the six-decade history of the Conservancy — a lot.

Full Article

Coral Reefs Soften Ocean’s Fury for Millions of Coastal Dwellers

Coral reefs harbor great diversity and absorb an amazing 97% of the energy from incoming waves. Restoration is < 1/10th the cost of building more breakwaters.

Full Article

Green is Good: Science-Based Conservation in the 21st Century

What does it mean for The Nature Conservancy to be “science-based” today? To always be casting a wider net for better solutions supported by evidence, write Mark Tercek and Peter Kareiva.

Full Article

Island Biogeography Theory Misses Mark for Tropical Forest Remnants

Species losses due to habitat fragmentation may be less bleak than predicted under the island biogeography theory, says a study of bat biodiversity in Costa Rica and Panama.

Full Article

Evidence-based Conservation: An Economic Perspective

What does it mean to be smart about pursuing conservation objectives? Timm Kroeger presents the how and why of maximizing conservation “return” on investments.

Full Article

The Atchafalaya River Basin: The Future of Nature?

Louisiana’s Atchafalaya River Basin isn’t just “Swamp People” — it’s 1 million acres of amazing biodiversity and heavily engineered nature covered by decades of science. Learn why the Conservancy’s Bryan Piazza just had to write a book about it.

Full Article

Leech Logic and the Need for Conservation Baselines

For 2,000 years people thought leeches cured just about any ailment. Silly? Blogger Craig Leisher argues that conservationists often take a similar anecdote-based approach, which is why the field desperately needs solid baseline data.

Full Article

SNAP: Announcing Six New Working Groups & New RFP

Discover all the new issues the Science for Nature and People (SNAP) collaboration will be taking on — including urban water supplies, sustainable ag intensification and fracking’s impacts on water quality and quantity.

Full Article

Investing in Seagrass Can Yield Big Returns, But It Requires Patience

Marine scientists and fishers alike know that grass beds are valuable as nursery habitat. A new Conservancy-funded study puts a number to it (and a pretty one).

Full Article


Forest Dilemmas

Too many deer. Logging one tree to save another. Beavers versus old growth. Welcome to forest conservation in the 21st century. Join us for a provocative 5-part series exploring the full complexity facing forest conservation in the eastern United States.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is managed by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications, and edited by Bob Lalasz, its director of science communications. Email us your feedback.

Innovative Science

Investing in Seagrass
Marine scientists and fishers alike know that grass beds are valuable as nursery habitat. A new Conservancy-funded study puts a number to it.

Drones Aid Bird Conservation
How can California conservationists accurately count thousands of cranes? Enter a new tool in bird monitoring: the drone.

Creating a Climate-Smart Agriculture
Can farmers globally both adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change? A new paper answers with a definitive yes. But it won't be easy.

Latest Tweets from @nature_brains

Categories