Category: Science Communications

Why Conservation Letters is Going 100% Open Access

Most conservation science is stuck behind paywalls — but now one of its highest-impact journals is making all its content free. Eddie Game — TNC senior scientist & Letters associate editor — explains why.

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Two Awards for Matt Miller

The Conservancy’s Matt Miller has won two awards from the Outdoor Writers Association of America for his Cool Green Science blogging.

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What’s the Dirty Little Secret of Science Communications?

We tell scientists they should communicate better as a public good, says Bob Lalasz. But market forces are pressing a more basic case — one we should embrace.

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Will ‘Cosmos’ Miss the Big Bang in Science Communications?

Can the reincarnation of Carl Sagan’s classic TV series (hosted by Neil deGrasse Tyson) be as successful as the original? And what might conservation science learn from the attempt?

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The Mahi-Mahi & The Map: Digital Storytelling for Science

How can a scientist convey a complex and even contentious topic like marine spatial planning to non-specialist audiences? Shawn Margles looks to digital storytelling to convey the emotion behind the science.

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The Myth of Suicidal Lemmings

It’s one of the most enduring wildlife images: thousands of lemmings following each other over a cliff. One problem: it’s not true. The real story of lemming migrations and “mass suicides.”

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Scientists: Is It So Hard to Know Your Audiences?

It’s easy to dump information on people; harder to know what would really speak to them. The good news: We already know more than we think we do.

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The Limits of Science Communications: Why Do People Live in Floodplains?

Science can play a role in informing one’s beliefs. But can it convince someone not to live in a floodplain? Our blogger tracks down the owner of this home destroyed by a flood and asks: Is it worth it?

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Quick Study: Why Conservation Science Needs to Get Interdisciplinary–and Why It Hasn’t

Being multidisciplinary isn’t enough for today’s conservation science, says a new study by Conservancy scientist Sheila Walsh Reddy and others–we need to get out of our siloes in order to help solve the world’s most pressing problems. But being truly interdisciplinary can be costly and difficult.

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The Cooler: Towards a Deeper Conversation on Invasive Species

You know the story: invasive species are bad, bad, bad. But what if that old story is a bit more…complicated? “Ecological hit men” Jeffrey A. Lockwood and Alexandre V. Latchininsky confront an invasive grasshopper on a remote island. And the more they look, the less clear the picture.

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The Cooler: Recycling and Our Mental Categories about Nature

New research says people are more likely to recycle standard-sized pieces of paper over “trashier” looking ones. Could conservation learn something from the findings about how to get people to value nature?

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The Cooler: Don’t Be Such a Science Communicator

Science communication is full of bumper-sticker advice — Don’t Be Such a Scientist, Tell Stories, Not Data, Use the 6×6 Rule. A new essay in PNAS says we should try more science instead.

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Locally Based Monitoring: Are Scientists at Risk of Losing Their Day Jobs?

Are scientists at risk of losing their day jobs? Well, maybe. A recent study shows that people from remote areas of Papua New Guinea are able to collect quantitative data as accurately as trained scientist, but for a fraction of the cost. This is the second essay in a three-part series featuring blogs by the student prize winners at the University of Queensland’s Student Conference on Conservation Science,

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Poorly Known Species at Most Risk from Extinction

Our incomplete knowledge of the biological world can have profound implications for the natural world. The less we know about a species, the higher the risk for extinction. Researcher Lucie Bland presents her findings in this essay, the first in a series of three blogs written by winners of the University of Queensland’s Student Conference on Conservation Science.

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The Cooler: Why Everyone’s Being Rational About Climate Change

A new study from Yale’s Dan Kahan says that everyone is being rational in their positions about climate change — even people who deny that it’s happening. How could that be? And what does it mean for climate communications?

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Salmon Cam Returns

We’re pleased to return Salmon Cam, a live view of spawning Chinook and coho salmon and steelhead trout.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is managed by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications, and edited by Bob Lalasz, its director of science communications. Email us your feedback.

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