Category: Quick Study

Safe(r) Spaces for Species under Climate Change

Climate change might change everything for conservation. How can we protect biodiversity as species move & adapt? New study says conserve “flexible” landscapes.

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Climate Change and Nutrition: It’s Not Just About Quantity

A new meta-analysis links increasing concentration of carbon dioxide with decreasing zinc and iron in plants, potentially affecting close to 2 billion people.

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Definition as Intention: “Climate Adaptation”

A broad strokes definition of “climate adaptation” is enough to get resource managers talking and thinking. But getting to action may require more specifics.

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Seeing the Trees – Without Losing Sight of the Forest

Lower resolution satellite images may be OK for global land cover, but for patchy, human-dominated landscapes, higher resolution matters–a lot.

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Logging Carbon by Trailing Loggers

Reduced Impact Logging (RIL) is good for our carbon footprint, right? Not consistently, say Conservancy scientists studying logging practices in Indonesia.

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When Life Depends on Corals, What Marks the Most Promising Reef?

A new study from Tobago after a mass coral bleaching event in 2010 shows reef resilience is as much about location as it is about species.

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Quick Study: Counterinsurgency, Anyone? How Conservation Can Better Prepare for ‘Wicked’ Problems

Conservation still uses a straightforward, engineering mindset that’s inadequate for tackling today’s complex problems, argues a new paper from Conservancy scientist Eddie Game. So what can we learn from counter-insurgency, business, psychology and other fields?

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Quick Study: Why Conservation Science Needs to Get Interdisciplinary–and Why It Hasn’t

Being multidisciplinary isn’t enough for today’s conservation science, says a new study by Conservancy scientist Sheila Walsh Reddy and others–we need to get out of our siloes in order to help solve the world’s most pressing problems. But being truly interdisciplinary can be costly and difficult.

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Quick Study: What Do New Food Safety Protocols Mean For Habitat and Wildlife?

No one wants to eat a salad full of E.coli. But are new farm-based food safety practices that aim to reduce potential contamination from wildlife really helping? And what impact could these practices have on nature and wildlife?

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Quick Study: Do REDD+ Projects Benefit People as Well as Forests?

They often provide modest but tangible benefits to local communities–and don’t encourage land grabs, says a new article co-authored by the Conservancy’s senior advisor on forests and climate. But challenges remain to meaningful community participation in these projects.

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Quick Study: A California-Style Approach to Sustainable Fisheries

Quick Study is just what it says — a rapid-fire look at a new conservation science study that might turn some heads.

The Question(s): For decades, ocean bottom trawling has been the predominate method for catching groundfish (like flounder, halibut and sole) along the U.S. West Coast. But dragging weighted nets across the seafloor is destructive to bottom habitats and can result in large amounts of bycatch (netting of other species, including some that are ecologically valuable). Could a market-based approach to buy out trawl permits, combined with a collaborative effort to identify and protect ecologically sensitive areas, help protect species and a fishing industry?

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Forest Dilemmas

Too many deer. Logging one tree to save another. Beavers versus old growth. Welcome to forest conservation in the 21st century. Join us for a provocative 5-part series exploring the full complexity facing forest conservation in the eastern United States.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is managed by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications, and edited by Bob Lalasz, its director of science communications. Email us your feedback.

Innovative Science

Investing in Seagrass
Marine scientists and fishers alike know that grass beds are valuable as nursery habitat. A new Conservancy-funded study puts a number to it.

Drones Aid Bird Conservation
How can California conservationists accurately count thousands of cranes? Enter a new tool in bird monitoring: the drone.

Creating a Climate-Smart Agriculture
Can farmers globally both adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change? A new paper answers with a definitive yes. But it won't be easy.

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