Category: People and Conservation

Where Camels & Kangaroos Roam: A Dispatch from Australia’s Martu Country

The country belonging to the Martu people of Western Australia is one of the most intact aridlands on earth. But water is at a premium, and feral camels are drinking that water. Yes, camels.

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Peter Kareiva on “What’s Good for Nature is Good for Business”

The Nature Conservancy’s chief scientist joins an Intelligence Squared debate on whether capitalism and healthy nature are compatible. Watch the video.

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Heather Tallis: The Human Dimensions of Conservation

Nature Conservancy lead scientist Heather Tallis will speak this week on women in science careers, mainstreaming nature’s value & inspiring environmental action. Watch live.

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Shoot Out the Lights: Science, Hydropower & Reality on the Mekong

The standard story: big dams disrupt the livelihoods of rural villages. But many communities welcome development; Can conservation minimize hydropower impacts?

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Seven Billion and Counting: Population and the Planet

A panel discussion brings together leaders of population and environment groups to talk about the opportunities to improve livelihoods and conserve nature.

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Understanding Global Environmental Indicators: What’s Behind Australia’s Rankings Rise?

Australia has hardly been a bastion of progressive environmental policy over the past two years. Yet the country rose from 48th place to 3rd in the Yale Environmental Performance Index. What’s going on here? Blogger Eddie Game explains.

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Conservation Next? Getting Real about Rural Stewardship

Conservation’s work with rural land stewards in developing countries is creating an unintentional stewardship vacuum, says Conservancy Lead Scientist Heather Tallis — and we need a new approach.

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Re-Branding Nature: From Dismal Swamp to Constructed Wetland

Swamps were once considered disease-ridden, alligator-infested places. Now they’re hailed for the ecosystem services they provide–but for that image to stick, constructed wetlands have to be based on the best-available science.

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Announcing SNAP: Because Everyone’s Prosperity Depends on Nature

Science for Nature and People (SNAP) debuts at the Clinton Global Initiative, and Mark Tercek says the collaboration will help the world better understand connections between healthy nature and human well-being.

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Saved by Chance: The Incredibly Strange Story of the Pere David’s Deer

The Pere David’s deer may be the only species saved because someone broke a wildlife law. It now is a creature of British deer parks and Texas wildlife ranches, facing a secure future far from its native habitat. What lessons can we learn from this near-collision with extinction?

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Quick Study: Why Conservation Science Needs to Get Interdisciplinary–and Why It Hasn’t

Being multidisciplinary isn’t enough for today’s conservation science, says a new study by Conservancy scientist Sheila Walsh Reddy and others–we need to get out of our siloes in order to help solve the world’s most pressing problems. But being truly interdisciplinary can be costly and difficult.

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In a Remote Alaska Rainforest, a Tribe Protects Habitat and Restores Culture

On Prince of Wales Island in Alaska, the restoration of rivers goes hand-in-hand with the restoration of cultural traditions. Members of the Hydaburg Cooperative Association, a federally recognized indigenous tribe, are learning scientific techniques to monitor and assess salmon streams, streams that have been degraded over the decades. But that’s only part of the story: the Haida area also returning to cultural traditions, traditions even more imperiled than the streams.

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People of the Salmon: Haida Tribe Defends Salmon with Science in Alaska

The Haida community on Prince of Wales Island, Alaska, have long considered themselves “people of the salmon.” They rely on the fish for their food and culture. Now community members are being trained to become scientists. Their assessments could help get their streams protected under Alaska state law.

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Traveling Naturalist: Elephants, Kudus and More in Tarangire National Park

The Traveling Naturalist visits Tarangire National Park in northern Tanzania, home to one of the largest herds of elephants in Africa, unusual antelope, migrating zebras, lions and warthogs and much, much more. Can it stay that way? Does tourism help?

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Too Many Deer: A Bigger Threat to Eastern Forests than Climate Change?

Yes, white-tailed deer are beautiful, charismatic creatures. But there can be too much of a good thing. Three Nature Conservancy authors argue that deer are now the greatest threat to Eastern forest. To address the problem means not only managing deer, but managing people. What do you think?

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noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

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3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

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