Category: Marine

When the “Big One” Hits New York: Conservancy Science in the News

What if Superstorm Sandy had been worse? Grist looks to Conservancy science for the answers.

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Natural Allies for the Next Sandy: Nicole Maher & Mike Beck in The New York Times

How important are natural habitats in blunting the effects of storms like Hurricane Sandy? The New York Times reports on the question, quoting Conservancy scientists Nicole Maher and Mike Beck.

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New Science: Mangrove Forests as Incredible Carbon Stores

Based on these new findings, says Conservancy marine scientist Mark Spalding, the world should be investing a lot more in preventing mangrove loss and restoration.

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Coastal Resilience 2.0: Assessing Risk and Identifying Solutions to Coastal Hazards

Is there any way to predict the severity and damage posed by storms and flooding to communities? Who is most at risk? And what can we do about it? Introducing Coastal Resilience 2.0.

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Fishing for Clues: Investigating Fisher Behavior in a Tropical Purse-Seine Fishery

How do fishers decide when, where and how to fish? How does this influence fishery management and protection? Tim Davies presents his research on how tropical purse seine fishers make their decisions, and the implications for conservation. This is the second essay in a three-part series featuring blogs by the student prize winners at the University of Queensland’s Student Conference on Conservation Science,

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Must-See Deep-Sea TV: The Okeanos Explorer

Watch cool creatures on the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean floor right now! The Okeanos Explorer’s live camera is looking at deep-sea marine life — Conservancy scientist Jay Odell explains why and why it’s so cool.

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Can Mangroves Adapt to Rising Seas?

Mangroves have had a hard-knock life, with coastal development destroying at least 35% of the world’s tidal forests in recent decades. Scientists have feared that rising seas would be the final blow. But mangroves just might be able to rise above, says a new report.

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New Study: Coastal Nature Reduces Risk from Storm Impacts for 1.3 Million U.S. Residents

Nature reduces risk from coastal storms for millions of U.S. residents and billions of dollars in property values, says a new study from scientists at the Natural Capital Project and The Nature Conservancy.

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Quick Study: When Can Eating More Fish Actually Benefit Fish Populations and Fishermen?

What effect does consumer demand have on fish populations? If you assumed it would be negative, this case study from Nature Conservancy scientist Sheila Walsh and others might make you re-think your position.

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Conservation Future: Announcing the 2013 NatureNet Fellows

Nine young scientists — with specialties ranging from energy infrastructure to urban ecology, Kenyan pastoral techniques to nanotechnology — inaugurate a program designed to help kick-start conservation toward addressing the challenges facing people and nature in the 21st century.

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The Horseshoe Crab: World’s Most Successful Animal

Move over, cockroaches. Blogger Craig Leisher argues that it’s the horseshoe crab that’s the ultimate survivor. But can this ancient species survive a new list of human-induced threats?

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Marine Restoration Week: The Future of Sea Grass & Shellfish Restoration Science

Eelgrass and shellfish restoration programs are among the most successful in The Nature Conservancy’s marine portfolio — but what’s left to understand or implement? Bo Lusk, marine steward with The Nature Conservancy’s Virginia Coast Reserve program, discusses both the science we still need to accelerate the impact of sea grass and shellfish restoration, and what science we already have that should be applied more widely.

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Marine Restoration Week: The Future of Coral Restoration Science

What science do we need that could jump start wide-spread coral reef restoration? And what science do we already know that needs wider application? James Byrne, marine science program manager for The Nature Conservancy’s South Florida and Caribbean programs, says it’s about maximizing genetic diversity, learning how to grow a coral thicket, and mapping out the locations over and under the 10 percent live coral cover tipping point.

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Marine Restoration Week: Restoring Blue Forests–Opportunities for Mangroves

Mangroves are tough, opportunistic weeds, says Conservancy senior marine scientist Mark Spalding. But that doesn’t just mean you can restore them anywhere — there’s a narrow line above mid-tide that works, and legalities and laziness cause many restoration projects to fail. Communicate the science of proper mangrove planting, though, and you’ve got one of the most optimistic conservation tools around.

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Marine Restoration Week: Tales from the Cab — Risk & Restoration in SE Louisiana

Conservancy Lead Marine Scientist Mike Beck comes off a week of conversations in New Orleans about coastal hazards to have the best talk of all about them with a cab driver — who blows him away with his knowledge of flood insurance and federal policy, the protective role of wetlands in Louisiana, and why we need to restore them now.

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The Ospreys Are Back!
Live views, 24/7, of an Alabama osprey nest. Record your observations and ask our ecologist about what you’re seeing.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is edited by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications, and managed by Lisa Feldkamp, an American Council of Learned Societies fellow with the TNC science communications team. Email us your feedback.

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