Category: Forests

Even Forest Superpowers Have Limits

A new paper out in the Journal Nature this week adds a frightening twist to an enduring mystery around the role of forests and climate change. Forest carbon scientist Peter Ellis reports on what this means for conservation.

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Can Cutting Trees Save Wolves?

Wolves. Logging. Trapping. Endangered species listings. No, we’re not trying to incite a fight. Nor is this the narrative you expect. A story of conservation science reducing conflict while benefiting people and wildlife.

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Checkerboard: Putting Western Forest Pieces Back Together

The Conservancy’s recent acquisition of 165,000 acres of private “checkerboard” forests in Washington and Montana has been heralded for improving recreational access. But it also has profound implications for improving forest management and wildlife connectivity.

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Working With Loggers for Forest Conservation: New E&E News Series

Is logging compatible with forest conservation? E&E News investigates with a three-part series featuring the work of Nature Conservancy scientist Peter Ellis & others.

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A Fully Loaded, Double-Barreled Forest Climate Solution

A recent New York Times op-ed by Nadine Unger claimed planting trees would actually accelerate climate change. Here’s why she’s wrong–and why forest conservation is critical to any climate solution.

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Fading Forests: The High Cost of Invasive Pests

In the past 12 years, 28 new invasive pests have been introduced to North American forests, exacting high ecological and economic tolls. What’s going on? Can anything stop the spread? A new report, Fading Forests III, offers concrete recommendations.

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Juggling Chainsaws: Carbon, Biodiversity, and Livelihoods in the Logging Landscape

Smaller areas of high intensity wood production or larger areas of lower-impact logging? It’s not a simple question — and maybe not even the right one.

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Rudolph Versus Bambi: A Conservation Story

Rudolph versus Bambi? No, it’s not the worst holiday special ever. It’s a real struggle between endangered woodland caribou and too-abundant white-tailed deer along the U.S./Canada border. “Bambi” is winning. Can conservationists do anything about it?

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A Lung Scan for the Planet: A New Global Forest Change Interactive Map

A map that inspires? The new interactive Global Forest Change Map provides an incredible look at our global forests. And it could change the way we conserve them.

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Shade Coffee: Not Just for the Birds

When it comes to coffee, we not only need to think about who grows the bean, but also how and where it is grown. Shade coffee is worth the investment, says Tim Boucher.

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In a Remote Alaska Rainforest, a Tribe Protects Habitat and Restores Culture

On Prince of Wales Island in Alaska, the restoration of rivers goes hand-in-hand with the restoration of cultural traditions. Members of the Hydaburg Cooperative Association, a federally recognized indigenous tribe, are learning scientific techniques to monitor and assess salmon streams, streams that have been degraded over the decades. But that’s only part of the story: the Haida area also returning to cultural traditions, traditions even more imperiled than the streams.

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People of the Salmon: Haida Tribe Defends Salmon with Science in Alaska

The Haida community on Prince of Wales Island, Alaska, have long considered themselves “people of the salmon.” They rely on the fish for their food and culture. Now community members are being trained to become scientists. Their assessments could help get their streams protected under Alaska state law.

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Too Many Deer: A Bigger Threat to Eastern Forests than Climate Change?

Yes, white-tailed deer are beautiful, charismatic creatures. But there can be too much of a good thing. Three Nature Conservancy authors argue that deer are now the greatest threat to Eastern forest. To address the problem means not only managing deer, but managing people. What do you think?

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Forests: A Rising Global Climate Superpower?

It’s true: forests are already acting as a major solution to climate change, despite taking it on the chin from human activities. But does large role of forests in the greenhouse gas story translate to a large opportunity for an affordable forest solution to climate change? Bronson Griscom, the Conservancy’s director of forest carbon science, makes the case for forests as a rising climate superpower.

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Dead Wood & Migrating Salmon: Restoring a Southeast Alaska Stream

A neat and tidy stream may look bucolic, even scenic. But for salmon it’s a dead end. On Prince of Wales Island in Southeast Alaska, land managers once removed dead wood from streams to “clean” them. That action was based on assumption, not science. Salmon need dead wood. They need diversity. Now a restoration effort is putting the logs back into the stream, creating “fish condos” for salmon.

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