Category: Forests

Fading Forests: The High Cost of Invasive Pests

In the past 12 years, 28 new invasive pests have been introduced to North American forests, exacting high ecological and economic tolls. What’s going on? Can anything stop the spread? A new report, Fading Forests III, offers concrete recommendations.

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Juggling Chainsaws: Carbon, Biodiversity, and Livelihoods in the Logging Landscape

Smaller areas of high intensity wood production or larger areas of lower-impact logging? It’s not a simple question — and maybe not even the right one.

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Rudolph Versus Bambi: A Conservation Story

Rudolph versus Bambi? No, it’s not the worst holiday special ever. It’s a real struggle between endangered woodland caribou and too-abundant white-tailed deer along the U.S./Canada border. “Bambi” is winning. Can conservationists do anything about it?

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A Lung Scan for the Planet: A New Global Forest Change Interactive Map

A map that inspires? The new interactive Global Forest Change Map provides an incredible look at our global forests. And it could change the way we conserve them.

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Shade Coffee: Not Just for the Birds

When it comes to coffee, we not only need to think about who grows the bean, but also how and where it is grown. Shade coffee is worth the investment, says Tim Boucher.

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In a Remote Alaska Rainforest, a Tribe Protects Habitat and Restores Culture

On Prince of Wales Island in Alaska, the restoration of rivers goes hand-in-hand with the restoration of cultural traditions. Members of the Hydaburg Cooperative Association, a federally recognized indigenous tribe, are learning scientific techniques to monitor and assess salmon streams, streams that have been degraded over the decades. But that’s only part of the story: the Haida area also returning to cultural traditions, traditions even more imperiled than the streams.

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People of the Salmon: Haida Tribe Defends Salmon with Science in Alaska

The Haida community on Prince of Wales Island, Alaska, have long considered themselves “people of the salmon.” They rely on the fish for their food and culture. Now community members are being trained to become scientists. Their assessments could help get their streams protected under Alaska state law.

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Too Many Deer: A Bigger Threat to Eastern Forests than Climate Change?

Yes, white-tailed deer are beautiful, charismatic creatures. But there can be too much of a good thing. Three Nature Conservancy authors argue that deer are now the greatest threat to Eastern forest. To address the problem means not only managing deer, but managing people. What do you think?

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Forests: A Rising Global Climate Superpower?

It’s true: forests are already acting as a major solution to climate change, despite taking it on the chin from human activities. But does large role of forests in the greenhouse gas story translate to a large opportunity for an affordable forest solution to climate change? Bronson Griscom, the Conservancy’s director of forest carbon science, makes the case for forests as a rising climate superpower.

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Dead Wood & Migrating Salmon: Restoring a Southeast Alaska Stream

A neat and tidy stream may look bucolic, even scenic. But for salmon it’s a dead end. On Prince of Wales Island in Southeast Alaska, land managers once removed dead wood from streams to “clean” them. That action was based on assumption, not science. Salmon need dead wood. They need diversity. Now a restoration effort is putting the logs back into the stream, creating “fish condos” for salmon.

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Sawmills and the Limits of Conservation Science

Science must be the foundation of conservation work, of course. But here’s the thing: science can only get conservation so far. On Prince of Wales Island, forest restoration is an important part of conservation, but so too are relationships with loggers and sawmill owners.

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Quick Study: Do REDD+ Projects Benefit People as Well as Forests?

They often provide modest but tangible benefits to local communities–and don’t encourage land grabs, says a new article co-authored by the Conservancy’s senior advisor on forests and climate. But challenges remain to meaningful community participation in these projects.

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Forest Dilemmas

Too many deer. Logging one tree to save another. Beavers versus old growth. Welcome to forest conservation in the 21st century. Join us for a provocative 5-part series exploring the full complexity facing forest conservation in the eastern United States.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is managed by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications, and edited by Bob Lalasz, its director of science communications. Email us your feedback.

Innovative Science

Investing in Seagrass
Marine scientists and fishers alike know that grass beds are valuable as nursery habitat. A new Conservancy-funded study puts a number to it.

Drones Aid Bird Conservation
How can California conservationists accurately count thousands of cranes? Enter a new tool in bird monitoring: the drone.

Creating a Climate-Smart Agriculture
Can farmers globally both adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change? A new paper answers with a definitive yes. But it won't be easy.

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