Category: Cool Green Scientist

Quick Study: Why Conservation Science Needs to Get Interdisciplinary–and Why It Hasn’t

Being multidisciplinary isn’t enough for today’s conservation science, says a new study by Conservancy scientist Sheila Walsh Reddy and others–we need to get out of our siloes in order to help solve the world’s most pressing problems. But being truly interdisciplinary can be costly and difficult.

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Cool Green Scientist: Dayna Gross

The Conservancy’s conservation manager for the Silver Creek area in Idaho is a Jill-of-all-trades and a master of opposites, blending a love for art and science, of things big and small, of being active and sitting still. Meet Dayna.

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Cool Green Scientist: Anne Bradley

Anne Bradley is The Nature Conservancy’s forest conservation program director in New Mexico. Find out in this interview why the “sky islands” of the Jemez Mountains inspire her, why singing in bear country is a very good idea, and why conservation has always been about people’s values.

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Featured Content

Osprey Cam: Watch Our Wild Neighbors
Watch the ospreys live 24/7 as they nest and raise their young -- and learn more about these fascinating birds from our scientist.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is managed by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications at the Conservancy, and edited by Bob Lalasz, its director of science communications. Email us your feedback.

Editors’ Choice

Where Have The Monarchs Gone?
Monarch butterflies are disappearing. What's going on? Is there anything we can do about it?

North America's Greatest Bird Spectacle?
The Platte River is alive with 500,000 sandhill cranes. Learn how you can catch the action--even from your computer.

The Strangest Wildlife Rescue?
Meet the animal that was saved from extinction because someone broke a wildlife law.

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