Category: Citizen Science

Citizen Science Tuesday: Pika Project

Citizen Science Tuesday connects you to projects that benefit conservation. This week: go to the mountains and take some pika pics.

Full Article

Citizen Science Tuesday: oldWeather

Citizen Science Tuesday connects you to projects that benefit conservation. This week: take a voyage with the mariners of oldWeather and improve data for climate models.

Full Article

Citizen Science Tuesday: NestWatch

Citizen Science Tuesday connects you to projects that benefit conservation. This week: track the reproductive success of birds and improve understanding of challenges they face with NestWatch. Who doesn’t want to spend time watching baby birds?

Full Article

Citizen Science Tuesday: Project BudBurst

Our new series connects you to citizen science projects that benefit conservation. First up: record when trees bloom and wildflowers blossom to help Project BudBurst track the effects of climate change.

Full Article

Eurasian Collared Dove: Have You Seen This Bird?

Thirty years ago, non-native Eurasian collared doves were starting to show up in South Florida. Today, this species is being documented across North America. How citizen scientists help document the spread of a non-native species.

Full Article

Birders: Report Forest Pests During the Great Backyard Bird Count

The Great Backyard Bird Count is one of the largest citizen science efforts in the world. Learn how participants can expand their impact by reporting invasive forest pests.

Full Article

Dragonfly Migration: A Mystery Citizen Scientists Can Help Solve

A dragonfly holds the record for the longest insect migration. And yet dragonfly migration remains a poorly understood ecological phenomenon. Take note, citizen scientists: your observations can contribute significantly to our understanding of the species, and it’s importance to conservation. Break out your field guide and look around city park or backyard.

Full Article

Citizen Science: Survey Katydids in Your Neighborhood

That night music you hear coming from the trees? At least in part, that’s coming from katydids. Despite their ubiquity, very little is known about these charismatic critters. But you can help. Grab your smart phone and head into your neighborhood for a katydid census! Blogger Jon Fisher gets you started.

Full Article

Cool Green Review: Spine of the Continent, Imperial Dreams

Welcome to Cool Green Review, our monthly look at notable conservation science books. This month: Mary Ellen Hannibal’s The Spine of the Continent and Tim Gallagher’s Imperial Dreams.

Full Article

Spotting Banded Birds: Another Way Birders Can Contribute to Citizen Science

Anyone with a pair of binoculars is able to contribute to our understanding of migratory birds by simply keeping a look out for birds with bands. Birders Pat and Doris Leary have made significant contributions to science by focusing on bird bands and reporting their findings. You can help, too. Our blogger tells you how birders can turn every outing into an exciting citizen science project.

Full Article

Farewell to Osprey Cam

All kids eventually leave home to make their own way in the world. While most human parents have 18 years or so years to prepare for the inevitable “empty nest” syndrome, bird parents only have a few months. Such is the case with our charismatic osprey family on Alabama’s Gulf Coast, stars of this summer’s popular blog and social media hit, Osprey Cam. Now, eager wildlife cam fans want to know: will the osprey cam be renewed in 2014?

Full Article

Cloud Computing: A Key Tool in the Fight Against Invasive Species

iMapInvasives is a cloud-based database and mapping system that tracks and monitors invasive species in real-time. It’s also a great way to get citizen-scientists and conservation volunteers involved in the fight against invasive species. And the use of the tool is spreading fast (much like an invasive species does, you might say).

Full Article

Citizen Science: The Lost Ladybug Project

Preserve manager Dayna Gross’ sons were already skilled bug collectors. Now their hobby is contributing to a conservation science effort to understand ladybug population declines. You can help, too. Grab a net, head out into your backyard and join the Lost Ladybug Project.

Full Article

Osprey Cam: Reality TV Featuring Our Wild Neighbors

There are some new neighbors in town, and I can’t stop spying on them!

Allie and Bama recently moved to Orange Beach, Alabama. They live on prime real estate in this pristine beach town along the northern Gulf Coast. The climate is sub-tropical, grocery shopping is close-by, and the commute to work is more than manageable. They utilize locally sourced food for nourishment and have recycled building material for their humble abode. Their family is healthy and quickly growing with the arrival of two new offspring.

Allie, Bama and their newborns are not your typical beach-town family. They are birds of prey, called osprey (Pandion haliaetus) and in late spring this spring, The Nature Conservancy and our partners installed a camera to monitor their activities 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

We have been invited into the home of Allie and Bama, and it has been the best unscripted reality show I’ve ever seen!

Full Article

Boucher’s Birding Blog: Apps for the Smart Birder — Which One Should You Use?

Need an app that helps you identify birds in the field? Don’t bother searching for “birds” in any app store. Unless that thrush happens to be angry, those dozens of Angry Bird apps that pop up won’t be of any use to you.

So here is my expert take on 5 iPhone birding apps — Audubon Birds, iBird Pro, National Geographic Birds, Peterson Birds, and Sibley eGuide to Birds (all also available on Android) — that are focused on the things that birders need for identifying birds in the field:

Full Article


Featured Content

Osprey Cam: Watch Our Wild Neighbors
Watch the ospreys live 24/7 as they nest and raise their young -- and learn more about these fascinating birds from our scientist.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is managed by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications at the Conservancy, and edited by Bob Lalasz, its director of science communications. Email us your feedback.

Editors’ Choice

Where Have The Monarchs Gone?
Monarch butterflies are disappearing. What's going on? Is there anything we can do about it?

North America's Greatest Bird Spectacle?
The Platte River is alive with 500,000 sandhill cranes. Learn how you can catch the action--even from your computer.

The Strangest Wildlife Rescue?
Meet the animal that was saved from extinction because someone broke a wildlife law.

Latest Tweets from @nature_brains

Categories