Zach Ferdaña

Zach Ferdaña is the Senior Marine Conservation Planner for the Global Marine Initiative of The Nature Conservancy. This position supports the implementation of marine conservation strategies in the U.S. and internationally covering marine spatial planning, ecosystem-based management and adaptation approaches. Using GIS technology and the Conservancy’s site and regional planning frameworks, Ferdaña has focused the organization to adopt planning innovations in coastal, nearshore, and offshore environments. He currently serves as the Coastal Resilience network program manager, a variety of projects using interactive decision support web mapping applications to represent information on coastal habitats and hazards, restoration and climate adaptation. He received his degree in Environmental Studies at The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington, with concentration in Landscape Ecology and Marine Mammal Biology in 1994. He then went on to earn an advanced technical degree in GIS at the University of Washington in 1998. He joined The Nature Conservancy in 2000.


Zach's Posts

Coastal Resilience 2.0: Assessing Risk and Identifying Solutions to Coastal Hazards

Is there any way to predict the severity and damage posed by storms and flooding to communities? Who is most at risk? And what can we do about it? Introducing Coastal Resilience 2.0.

Posted In: Marine
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Featured Content

Osprey Cam: Watch Our Wild Neighbors
Watch the ospreys live 24/7 as they nest and raise their young -- and learn more about these fascinating birds from our scientist.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is managed by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications at the Conservancy, and edited by Bob Lalasz, its director of science communications. Email us your feedback.

Editors’ Choice

Where Have The Monarchs Gone?
Monarch butterflies are disappearing. What's going on? Is there anything we can do about it?

North America's Greatest Bird Spectacle?
The Platte River is alive with 500,000 sandhill cranes. Learn how you can catch the action--even from your computer.

The Strangest Wildlife Rescue?
Meet the animal that was saved from extinction because someone broke a wildlife law.

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