Timothy Boucher

Timothy Boucher

Timothy Boucheris a senior conservation geographer at The Nature Conservancy, where his work ranges from complex spatial analyses to extensive field studies, focusing on ecosystem services and linkages between human well-being and conservation. He has worked on global to local issues, done fieldwork spanning six continents, assessed land use and habitat conditions, and participated in numerous field expeditions. He is also an avid birder and amateur photographer as well as a regular cycling commuter.



Timothy's Posts

Boucher’s Bird of the Month: Horned Guan

Intrepid Conservancy birder Tim Boucher leaves the snow behind and heads to Guatemala in search of the rare and unusual Horned Guan.

Posted In: Birds
Full Article

Camera Trap Chronicles: The Mathews Mountains of Kenya

A camera trap survey in the Mathews Mountains of Kenya reveals mammals great and small. Join expedition Tim Boucher for a look at some of the most exciting photos and video of hyenas, lions and more.

Full Article

My Bird of the Year! (What Was Yours?)

Gunfire, running through downpours and holding faith through gloom — Conservancy Senior Conservation Geographer (and birder extraordinaire) Tim Boucher reveals how he finally saw his bird of the year. Read and tell us about yours!

Posted In: Birds
Full Article

Snowy Owl Invasion!

The snowy owls are here — especially if you live on the east coast! Birder extraordinaire Tim Boucher provides the latest on this natural phenomenon — and how you can see this dramatic bird near you.

Posted In: Birds
Full Article

Shade Coffee: Not Just for the Birds

When it comes to coffee, we not only need to think about who grows the bean, but also how and where it is grown. Shade coffee is worth the investment, says Tim Boucher.

Posted In: Birds, Forests, Science
Full Article

Boucher’s Birding Blog: Apps for the Smart Birder — Which One Should You Use?

Need an app that helps you identify birds in the field? Don’t bother searching for “birds” in any app store. Unless that thrush happens to be angry, those dozens of Angry Bird apps that pop up won’t be of any use to you.

So here is my expert take on 5 iPhone birding apps — Audubon Birds, iBird Pro, National Geographic Birds, Peterson Birds, and Sibley eGuide to Birds (all also available on Android) — that are focused on the things that birders need for identifying birds in the field:

Posted In: Birds, Citizen Science
Full Article

Boucher’s Birding Blog: Mamba Meets Bushbaby

Sometimes when you go birding, you can’t help but see other animals – elephants, army ants, beautiful butterflies.

Occasionally, if you get out early (as birders always do), you can get to a park before the crowds and you might see something really special (and, in this case, gruesome).

In January, we traveled to Ghana for some superb birding. Our visit included the famous canopy walkway at the Kakum National Park near the Ivory Coast. The seven bridges strung high up in the trees usually teem with visitors who have no appreciation of the amazing birdlife.

They might notice the monkeys, but for most, the canopy walkway is just a low-tech amusement ride. They shriek as they bounce from one platform to the next on the narrow, swaying  wooden planks.

We arrived very early, our guide having arranged for the park to admit us before the regular opening hour.  We were the first visitors on the path that climbs to the walkway.

It was barely light as we tramped up the steep hill, trying not to trip over hidden roots and rocks. As we reached a turn, we heard a ruckus near the trail – about head height — and we all peered into the tangle of vines and branches.  We had the surprise of our lives.

Full Article

Featured Content

Osprey Cam: Watch Our Wild Neighbors
Watch the ospreys live 24/7 as they nest and raise their young -- and learn more about these fascinating birds from our scientist.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is managed by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications at the Conservancy, and edited by Bob Lalasz, its director of science communications. Email us your feedback.

Editors’ Choice

Where Have The Monarchs Gone?
Monarch butterflies are disappearing. What's going on? Is there anything we can do about it?

North America's Greatest Bird Spectacle?
The Platte River is alive with 500,000 sandhill cranes. Learn how you can catch the action--even from your computer.

The Strangest Wildlife Rescue?
Meet the animal that was saved from extinction because someone broke a wildlife law.

Latest Tweets from @nature_brains

Categories