Sally Palmer

Sally-Palmer-headshotSally Palmer is director of science for The Nature Conservancy in Tennessee. She grew up wading in the Little Duck River and wandering around her great-grandmother’s flower garden in middle Tennessee. Trained as a plant ecologist at UNC-Chapel Hill, Sally has spent most of her 15 years with the Conservancy developing expertise in strategic planning and freshwater conservation. She lives with her husband and their two young sons outside Nashville.


Sally's Posts

Mind the Gap: Shattering the Glass Ceiling and Cinderella’s Slipper

Most media regarding women in the workplace tend to emphasize individual choices women ought to make to improve their own lots and ignore very real cultural limitations and institutional practices that, over time, hold women back. Plus, they are almost always limited to the perspective of white women who are citizens of the U.S., with advanced educations and socioeconomic status. This happens to be my perspective, and I find it tiresome to listen to us argue with one another when many women in the world would love to have our “problems.” So as a general rule, I tend to ignore these discussions altogether and stay occupied with my own small universe of responsibilities.

But is my attitude part of a problem?

I’m now asking myself this question because I was sucked in by the media blitz surrounding Sheryl Sandberg’s new book, Lean In. My science brain was set off by the discussions of behavioral cues and how humans — men and women, as individuals and collectively — respond to them. Humans are nothing if not adaptable, and women can be particularly adept at adapting to real or perceived barriers. I bought the book.

Posted In: Science, Social Science
Full Article

Forest Dilemmas

Too many deer. Logging one tree to save another. Beavers versus old growth. Welcome to forest conservation in the Anthropocene. Beginning Monday, July 21, join us for a provocative 5-part series exploring the full complexity facing forest conservation in the eastern United States.

Featured Content

Osprey Cam: Watch Our Wild Neighbors
Watch the ospreys live 24/7 as they nest and raise their young -- and learn more about these fascinating birds from our scientist.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is managed by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications, and edited by Bob Lalasz, its director of science communications. Email us your feedback.

Innovative Science

Investing in Seagrass
Marine scientists and fishers alike know that grass beds are valuable as nursery habitat. A new Conservancy-funded study puts a number to it.

Drones Aid Bird Conservation
How can California conservationists accurately count thousands of cranes? Enter a new tool in bird monitoring: the drone.

Creating a Climate-Smart Agriculture
Can farmers globally both adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change? A new paper answers with a definitive yes. But it won't be easy.

Latest Tweets from @nature_brains

Categories