Matt Miller

Matt-Miller-23Matt Miller is a senior science writer for the Conservancy. He writes features and blogs about the conservation research being conducted by the Conservancy’s 550 scientists. Matt previously worked for nearly 11 years as director of communications for the Conservancy’s Idaho program. He has served on the national board of directors of the Outdoor Writers Association of America, and has published widely on conservation, nature and outdoor sports. He has held two Coda fellowships, assisting conservation programs in Colombia and Micronesia. An avid naturalist and outdoorsman, Matt has traveled the world in search of wildlife and stories.


Matt's Posts

10 Top National Wildlife Refuges To Explore

For the traveling naturalist, there’s a lifetime of adventures to be found on national wildlife refuges. But with 560 refuges, where to start? Our blogger offers up his favorites for birds and other wildlife, from spotting tropical specialties in Texas to hiking amongst bighorn sheep in Oregon.

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Coyote Scat and Native Plant Conservation

Cultivating native plants for conservation requires the perfect water, sunlight, nutrients and pollinators. And in at least one case, it needs coyote poop. And lots of it. A story of an observant naturalist, palm seeds and hungry coyotes in South Texas.

Posted In: Native Plants
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Can Ancient Paddlefish Coexist with Modern Dams?

Paddlefish have been swimming rivers in North America for some 70 million years. But they’ve had difficulty adapting to dams. Can restoring healthy river flows restore paddlefish? An experiment underway at Caddo Lake on the Texas-Louisiana border hopes to find answers.

Posted In: Fish
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Fading Forests: The High Cost of Invasive Pests

In the past 12 years, 28 new invasive pests have been introduced to North American forests, exacting high ecological and economic tolls. What’s going on? Can anything stop the spread? A new report, Fading Forests III, offers concrete recommendations.

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Northern Elephant Seals: A Dramatic Conservation Success

Northern elephant seals were declared extinct, a victim of the blubber trade. Today, you can see thousands on California beaches, and the population continues to grow. The story of a dramatic (and often unheralded) conservation success.

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Lake Yellowstone: Promising News for Native Trout Recovery

Great news on the invasive species front: lake trout in Yellowstone National Park are on the decline, offering a more hopeful future for native fish. A two-year control effort based on the latest fisheries science is paying dividends, researchers say.

Posted In: Fish
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Protecting the Amargosa: From Suspicion to Support for a Desert River

Anti-environmental sentiments in rural Nevada have been in the news a lot lately. Here’s a different narrative. In the Mojave Desert of remote Nevada and California, conservationists are part of the community and working to overcome suspicion to protect a vibrant river.

Posted In: Nature Longread
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Pupfish: Conserving a Mojave Desert Survivor

Sure, desert pupfish are tough. Hot water temperatures? They thrive in it. Creeks saltier than the ocean? No problem. But now pupfish face a bigger challenge — people and their need for lots of water.

Posted In: Fish
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Spring’s Top 10 Wildlife Spectacles

Looking for a great wildlife road trip, or just a reason to explore the neighborhood park? Our blogger offers top 10 wildlife experiences for spring, from baby bison to mayfly madness.

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Coastal Wetland Restoration: One of the Smartest Investments We Can Make

For centuries, wetlands were considered worthless, regularly filled and paved. A new piece in Ensia magazine by Mark Tercek and Jane Lubchenco argues that restoring coastal wetlands benefits not only ecology but also our economy, our safety and our quality of life.

Posted In: Conservation News
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Climate-Smart Agriculture: Integrating Adaptation and Mitigation in the Tropics

Both adaptation and mitigation strategies will help farmers in the tropics deal with climate change. The problem? These strategies are often pursued separately, reducing their effectiveness in meeting broader conservation goals.

Posted In: Agriculture
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Plight of the Bumble Bee: Conserving Imperiled Native Pollinators

You’ve probably heard about the loss of honey bees. But did you know native bumble bees face even more alarming declines? These vital pollinators are disappearing due to pesticides and habitat loss. You can make a difference — right in your backyard.

Posted In: Pollinators
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Is Natural History Still Relevant for Conservation Science?

As conservation science increasingly draws from sophisticated models and genomics, does natural history still have relevance? Benjamin Kilham, a dyslexic who has made significant contributions to bear research, builds a powerful case for field observation in his book, “Out on a Limb.”

Posted In: Book Review
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Platte River Sandhill Cranes: Enjoying North America’s Greatest Bird Spectacle

Each year, more than 500,000 cranes congregate along 70 miles of Nebraska’s Platte River. Want to see one of the world’s great wildlife spectacles? Our blogger takes you to the heart of the action.

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Eurasian Collared Dove: Have You Seen This Bird?

Thirty years ago, non-native Eurasian collared doves were starting to show up in South Florida. Today, this species is being documented across North America. How citizen scientists help document the spread of a non-native species.

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Forest Dilemmas

Too many deer. Logging one tree to save another. Beavers versus old growth. Welcome to forest conservation in the Anthropocene. Beginning Monday, July 21, join us for a provocative 5-part series exploring the full complexity facing forest conservation in the eastern United States.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is managed by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications, and edited by Bob Lalasz, its director of science communications. Email us your feedback.

Innovative Science

Investing in Seagrass
Marine scientists and fishers alike know that grass beds are valuable as nursery habitat. A new Conservancy-funded study puts a number to it.

Drones Aid Bird Conservation
How can California conservationists accurately count thousands of cranes? Enter a new tool in bird monitoring: the drone.

Creating a Climate-Smart Agriculture
Can farmers globally both adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change? A new paper answers with a definitive yes. But it won't be easy.

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