Matt Miller

Matt-Miller-23Matt Miller is a senior science writer for the Conservancy. He writes features and blogs about the conservation research being conducted by the Conservancy’s 550 scientists. Matt previously worked for nearly 11 years as director of communications for the Conservancy’s Idaho program. He has served on the national board of directors of the Outdoor Writers Association of America, and has published widely on conservation, nature and outdoor sports. He has held two Coda fellowships, assisting conservation programs in Colombia and Micronesia. An avid naturalist and outdoorsman, Matt has traveled the world in search of wildlife and stories.


Matt's Posts

Sea Turtles of St. Croix: Research Benefits Nesting Beaches

Nesting sea turtles have staged a dramatic comeback at a Nature Conservancy site on St. Croix. What’s behind the success? Our blogger heads afield for a firsthand look at turtle research and monitoring.

Posted In: Nature Longread
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Video: Infrared Technology for Wildlife Conservation

Infrared enables us to see minor variations in temperature, even from a distance or at night. See how this technology is revolutionizing conservation science.

Posted In: Science
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Grouse Count: Aerial Infrared Technology Ensures Accurate Wildlife Census

The challenge: find a chicken-sized bird in a million-acre expanse of rugged canyons & bad roads. See how infrared sensing revolutionizes sage grouse counts.

Posted In: Science
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A Tale of Two Turkeys

It’s that time of year: join us for a taste, so to speak, of turkey natural history, conservation and science — including a look at a turkey that will definitely not be on your plate in two weeks (and doesn’t even gobble).

Posted In: Birds
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Eating Lionfish: Effective Conservation, or a Cure Worse than the Disease?

Around the Caribbean, there are lionfish safaris, lionfish fritters, even lionfish jewelry — all aimed at stopping a particularly damaging invasive species. But is this really effective conservation, or just lionfish hysteria?

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The Penguins of Boulders Beach

Forty years ago, Boulder Beach in South Africa had no penguins. Today, tourists flock there to see thousands of these charismatic birds. A conservation success? Not quite. The real story is a bit more complicated.

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Bison Return to Nachusa: A Behind-the-Scenes Look at Reintroduction

Bison are home on the range at Nachusa Grasslands in Illinois, as if they had never left. Join our behind-the-scenes look at the science, restoration and planning necessary for a successful bison reintroduction.

Posted In: Bison
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Review: Relicts of a Beautiful Sea

What good is a pupfish, anyway? Christopher Norment has spent the time in their pools, and has an answer. A review of his latest book, Relicts of a Beautiful Sea.

Posted In: Book Review
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New Study: Where Have All The Rangelands Gone?

It’s a familiar lament: rangelands are disappearing, lost in a sea of “for sale” signs and subdivisions. Can land protection tools make a difference?

Posted In: Science
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Quagga: Can an Extinct Animal be Bred Back into Existence?

In South Africa, there’s an ambitious effort underway to restore the quagga. The one complicating factor? Quaggas have been extinct since the 1800s. Is this innovative conservation at its finest, or an expensive gimmick?

Posted In: Mammals
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100 Words on Wildlife Connectivity

100 words: our new series featuring conservation concepts and commentary in 100 words. Today: understanding wildlife connectivity.

Posted In: 100 Words, bears
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Review: Alan Rabinowitz’s An Indomitable Beast

Why has the jaguar fared better than tigers and lions? How can we conserve these big cats in the face of development and other pressures? A remarkable scientific journey leads to a new look at this elusive creature in Alan Rabinowitz’s An Indomitable Beast.

Posted In: Book Review, Science
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Salmon Cam 2014: A Live Look at Migratory Fish

This fall, we’re pleased to return Salmon Cam, a live view at the Chinook and coho salmon and steelhead trout that are spawning on The Nature Conservancy in California’s Shasta Big Springs Ranch.

Posted In: Fish, Science
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Tracking a Secretive Snake on the Prairie

The plains hog-nosed snake — does it think it’s a cobra, or a possum? Researchers are finding a lot of surprises tracking this mysterious grasslands creature on Minnesota’s Chippewa Prairie, near a Nature Conservancy preserve.

Posted In: Reptiles
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Big Gulp: How Often Do Trout and Grayling Eat Mammals?

Many anglers know that trout eat the occasional mouse or shrew. But how often does this actually occur? New research from Bristol Bay on the dietary habits of rainbow trout and grayling suggests this answer: More often than you think.

Posted In: Fish
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Diverse Conservation

Call for Inclusive Conservation
Join Heather Tallis in a call to increase the diversity of voices and values in the conservation debate.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is managed by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications, and edited by Bob Lalasz, its director of science communications. Email us your feedback.

Innovative Science

Infrared Sage Grouse Count
The challenge: find a chicken-sized bird in a million-acre expanse of rugged canyons & bad roads. Infrared video to the rescue.

Wildlife Videos In Infrared
Infrared enables us to see minor variations in temperature. See how this technology is revolutionizing conservation science.

Nature As Normal
TNC Lead Scientist Heather Tallis is researching how to make people see nature as critical to life through three lenses: education, water and poverty.

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