Matt Miller

Matt-Miller-23Matt Miller is a senior science writer for the Conservancy. He writes features and blogs about the conservation research being conducted by the Conservancy’s 550 scientists. Matt previously worked for nearly 11 years as director of communications for the Conservancy’s Idaho program. He has served on the national board of directors of the Outdoor Writers Association of America, and has published widely on conservation, nature and outdoor sports. He has held two Coda fellowships, assisting conservation programs in Colombia and Micronesia. An avid naturalist and outdoorsman, Matt has traveled the world in search of wildlife and stories.


Matt's Posts

New Study: Where Have All The Rangelands Gone?

It’s a familiar lament: rangelands are disappearing, lost in a sea of “for sale” signs and subdivisions. Can land protection tools make a difference?

Posted In: Science
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Quagga: Can an Extinct Animal be Bred Back into Existence?

In South Africa, there’s an ambitious effort underway to restore the quagga. The one complicating factor? Quaggas have been extinct since the 1800s. Is this innovative conservation at its finest, or an expensive gimmick?

Posted In: Mammals
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100 Words on Wildlife Connectivity

100 words: our new series featuring conservation concepts and commentary in 100 words. Today: understanding wildlife connectivity.

Posted In: 100 Words, bears
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Review: Alan Rabinowitz’s An Indomitable Beast

Why has the jaguar fared better than tigers and lions? How can we conserve these big cats in the face of development and other pressures? A remarkable scientific journey leads to a new look at this elusive creature in Alan Rabinowitz’s An Indomitable Beast.

Posted In: Book Review, Science
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Salmon Cam 2014: A Live Look at Migratory Fish

This fall, we’re pleased to return Salmon Cam, a live view at the Chinook and coho salmon and steelhead trout that are spawning on The Nature Conservancy in California’s Shasta Big Springs Ranch.

Posted In: Fish, Science
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Tracking a Secretive Snake on the Prairie

The plains hog-nosed snake — does it think it’s a cobra, or a possum? Researchers are finding a lot of surprises tracking this mysterious grasslands creature on Minnesota’s Chippewa Prairie, near a Nature Conservancy preserve.

Posted In: Reptiles
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Big Gulp: How Often Do Trout and Grayling Eat Mammals?

Many anglers know that trout eat the occasional mouse or shrew. But how often does this actually occur? New research from Bristol Bay on the dietary habits of rainbow trout and grayling suggests this answer: More often than you think.

Posted In: Fish
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Profiles in Xeriscaping: Habitat for a Disease-Fighting Lizard

Yes, xeriscaping saves water and attracts pollinators. But the practice of planting native and drought-tolerant plants can have some unexpected benefits. Like attracting a lizard that can reduce the threat of Lyme disease. Seriously.

Posted In: Plants, Reptiles
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Weekend Book Picks: The Unpersuadables

Looking for a great read this Labor Day weekend? Take a virtual among the “enemies of science” — smart people who believe strange things — with Will Storr’s book The Unpersuadables.

Posted In: Book Review
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10 Great State Parks for Wildlife

Sure, national parks get all the press. But across the United States, state parks offer incredible opportunities for birders, wildlife photographers and other naturalists. Here are ten of the best.

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Follow the Cow that Follows the Burn

At the Chippewa Prairie in Minnesota, conservationists are using GPS tracking to learn the secret movements of an important grassland animal: Cows. Wait. Cows?

Posted In: Grasslands, Science
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Profiles in Xeriscaping: The Chocolate Flower

That chocolate brownie smell coming from the front yard? It IS the yard. Meet a drought-tolerant plant that fills the air with cocoa aromas, just one of the biological wonders of an xeriscaped lawn.

Posted In: Plants
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Follow That Curlew: Radio Tracking a Mysterious Migration

It’s easy to see long-billed curlews on their grassland nesting grounds. But little is known about them once they leave. A radio-tracking research program aims to shed light on the entire life cycle of this declining shorebird.

Posted In: Birds
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Protect Parrotfish, Protect the Reef?

A recent report argues that the path to saving Caribbean reefs starts with protecting parrotfish. That’s undeniably an important step, but that alone won’t save the reefs. A conversation with NatureNet Fellow Stephanie Wear on parrotfish and reef health.

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Update: Another Ocelot Killed in South Texas

Our series earlier this month focused on the issues facing ocelots along the border in South Texas. In a place where every cat counts, there has since been another sad loss of an ocelot on Texas roads. What can be done to stop the carnage?

Posted In: Mammals
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Salmon Cam Returns

We’re pleased to return Salmon Cam, a live view of spawning Chinook and coho salmon and steelhead trout.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is managed by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications, and edited by Bob Lalasz, its director of science communications. Email us your feedback.

Innovative Science

Forest Dilemmas
Too many deer. Logging one tree to save another. Beavers versus old growth. Welcome to forest conservation in the 21st century.

Drones Aid Bird Conservation
How can California conservationists accurately count thousands of cranes? Enter a new tool in bird monitoring: the drone.

Creating a Climate-Smart Agriculture
Can farmers globally both adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change? A new paper answers with a definitive yes. But it won't be easy.

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