Matt Miller

Matt-Miller-23Matt Miller is a senior science writer for the Conservancy. He writes features and blogs about the conservation research being conducted by the Conservancy’s 550 scientists. Matt previously worked for nearly 11 years as director of communications for the Conservancy’s Idaho program. He has served on the national board of directors of the Outdoor Writers Association of America, and has published widely on conservation, nature and outdoor sports. He has held two Coda fellowships, assisting conservation programs in Colombia and Micronesia. An avid naturalist and outdoorsman, Matt has traveled the world in search of wildlife and stories.


Matt's Posts

10 Field Guides for the Serious Naturalist

Looking to expand your wildlife ID skills beyond the usual bird guide? How about learning to identify dragonflies? Or warblers? Or squirrels and chipmunks? Our blog has you covered with some of the most innovative – and unusual – recent field guides.

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Sea Turtle Tasks: A Night in the Life of a Researcher

Seeing a sea turtle lumber onto a beach and lay its eggs is a spectacular experience and, for researchers, a lot of work. Follow them through a typical night on the beach.

Posted In: Science
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Ghost Hunters: Recovering Lost & Abandoned Fishing Gear Saves Fish

Long after commercial fishers have pulled into dock, their lost and abandoned gear continues fishing – threatening marine wildlife and habitat. Join Conservancy scientists and partners as they find ways to end the impacts of “ghost fishing.”

Posted In: Marine
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In Synch: Char & Salmon Migrations in Warming Waters

In Southeast Alaska, salmon are changing their annual migration patterns due to warming waters. Will one of their main predators — Dolly Varden char — adapt to the change?

Posted In: Fish
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Review: Richard J. King’s The Devil’s Cormorant

Birders: looking for a good read in the new year? Author Richard J. King delves into the realm of cormorants, and finds a tangled web of human-nature connections.

Posted In: Book Review
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Cool Green Science: The Top 10 Posts of 2014

From shrew-eating fish to coyote scat fertilizer, a celebration of our 10 most popular posts of 2014.

Posted In: Science
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Rudolph Versus Bambi: A Conservation Dilemma

For your holiday reading: Rudolph versus Bambi? It’s a real struggle between endangered woodland caribou and too-abundant white-tailed deer along the U.S./Canada border. “Bambi” is winning. Can conservationists do anything about it?

Posted In: Mammals
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Urban Wild: Flying Squirrels of the Beltway

To see the southern flying squirrel, you don’t make a trek into the wilderness or visit a national park. You need to visit a small nature preserve a short distance away from the bustling urbanity of the U.S. capitol.

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Of “Pizzlies” and Goose Dinners: The Latest Research on Polar Bears

Some call the polar bear a “climate change cliche.” And yet our interest in this Arctic animal only grows. What’s the latest? Enjoy our digest of recent polar bear research, media commentary and debate.

Posted In: Climate Change
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The Hooting Season: Enjoying Great Horned Owls

The breeding and nesting season for most birds is months away. But not so for great horned owls. Here’s what you need to enjoy the hooting extravaganza at a park near you.

Posted In: Birds
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Conservation Science 101: Understand Coral Bleaching

Coral bleaching is one of the major threats to reefs around the globe. But what exactly is coral bleaching? What does it actually do to reefs? Our Conservation Science 101 guide gives you the information you need to understand the most pressing issues.

Posted In: Science
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Video: Wyoming’s Great Migration

Across the Intermountain West, mule deer, pronghorns and other ungulates are on the move. The latest research offers a new glimpse into these old migrations. A video from the Wyoming Migration Initiative offers a good intro to this perilous journey.

Posted In: Mammals
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Sea Turtles of St. Croix: Research Benefits Nesting Beaches

Nesting sea turtles have staged a dramatic comeback at a Nature Conservancy site on St. Croix. What’s behind the success? Our blogger heads afield for a firsthand look at turtle research and monitoring.

Posted In: Nature Longread
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Video: Infrared Technology for Wildlife Conservation

Infrared enables us to see minor variations in temperature, even from a distance or at night. See how this technology is revolutionizing conservation science.

Posted In: Science
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Grouse Count: Aerial Infrared Technology Ensures Accurate Wildlife Census

The challenge: find a chicken-sized bird in a million-acre expanse of rugged canyons & bad roads. See how infrared sensing revolutionizes sage grouse counts.

Posted In: Science
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Diverse Conservation

Call for Inclusive Conservation
Join Heather Tallis in a call to increase the diversity of voices and values in the conservation debate.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is edited by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications, and managed by Lisa Feldkamp, an American Council of Learned Societies fellow with the TNC science communications team. Email us your feedback.

Innovative Science

Infrared Sage Grouse Count
The challenge: find a chicken-sized bird in a million-acre expanse of rugged canyons & bad roads. Infrared video to the rescue.

Wildlife Videos In Infrared
Infrared enables us to see minor variations in temperature. See how this technology is revolutionizing conservation science.

Nature As Normal
TNC Lead Scientist Heather Tallis is researching how to make people see nature as critical to life through three lenses: education, water and poverty.

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