Matt Miller

Matt-Miller-23Matt Miller is a senior science writer for the Conservancy. He writes features and blogs about the conservation research being conducted by the Conservancy’s 550 scientists. Matt previously worked for nearly 11 years as director of communications for the Conservancy’s Idaho program. He has served on the national board of directors of the Outdoor Writers Association of America, and has published widely on conservation, nature and outdoor sports. He has held two Coda fellowships, assisting conservation programs in Colombia and Micronesia. An avid naturalist and outdoorsman, Matt has traveled the world in search of wildlife and stories.


Matt's Posts

Protect Parrotfish, Protect the Reef?

A recent report argues that the path to saving Caribbean reefs starts with protecting parrotfish. That’s undeniably an important step, but that alone won’t save the reefs. A conversation with NatureNet Fellow Stephanie Wear on parrotfish and reef health.

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Update: Another Ocelot Killed in South Texas

Our series earlier this month focused on the issues facing ocelots along the border in South Texas. In a place where every cat counts, there has since been another sad loss of an ocelot on Texas roads. What can be done to stop the carnage?

Posted In: Mammals
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A Hackathon for Fish Conservation

Hackathons have swept through the tech industry, and have been used to quickly find innovative solutions in software, gaming and apps. Could a hackathon ever be used to solve a conservation challenge?

Posted In: Tech
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Beavers Versus Old Growth: The Tough Reality of Conservation

If ecologically important but abundant native beavers threaten ecologically important but imperiled old growth hemlocks, what should conservationists do? Leave it to beaver? Or save the hemlocks?

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Logging Ash to Save Hemlocks

The preserve was established specifically to protect trees from logging. But what happens when waves of forest pests are going to kill trees anyway? What if logging one tree could help save another? What trees live and what trees die? Welcome to forest conservation decisions, 2014 edition.

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Can Integrated Pest Management Save the Eastern Hemlock?

Around the eastern US, hemlocks are dying. Fast. Can anything save them? Some hopeful answers emerge from a Pennsylvania forest preserve.

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Notes from the Deer Wars: Science & Values in the Eastern Forest

The science is clear: over-abundant white-tailed deer are having powerful and negative impacts on the eastern forest. The human values around this issue, though, are anything but clear. Are environmentalists — and tradition-bound deer hunters — willing to pull the trigger?

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Change Comes to the Eastern Forest: Five-Part Series Begins Today

Woodbourne Forest Preserve in north-central Pennsylvania was to remain pristine and free of human management. Free of human management, that is, unless there were extraordinary, unforeseen circumstances. Those extraordinary circumstances are here. Welcome to forest conservation in the Anthropocene.

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Cristina Eisenberg on Large Predators, Large Landscapes and Coexistence

In our series interviewing conservation science leaders, we talk with Cristina Eisenberg, a leading researcher and writer on trophic cascades, large predators and how we can coexist with these animals.

Posted In: Green Giants
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Pygmy Rabbit Quest

Meet the pygmy rabbit: the tiniest rabbit on earth, and one of the most difficult North American mammals to spot. Our blogger journeys to southwest Wyoming to learn more about this elusive inhabitant of big sagebrush.

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Connecting The Ocelot’s Home on the Range

In South Texas, ocelot conservation means connecting the dots. But those “dots” happen to be thornscrub habitat — thick brush incompatible with most human use. How do you restore a habitat that ranchers have spent decades working hard to clear.

Posted In: Mammals
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Every Cat Counts: Conserving Ocelots on the Border

In South Texas, ocelots cling to a precarious existence. How do these spotted cats survive against a backdrop of lost habitat, roads and now a border fence? Can conservation efforts help?

Posted In: Mammals
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Nilgai: Blue Antelope of the Anthropocene

Once the nilgai roamed expansive Indian plains as it avoided stalking tigers. A creature of wilderness. Today, you’re more likely to find it in sprawling cities, or galloping along a Gulf Coast seashore. A creature of the Anthropocene.

Posted In: Mammals, Science
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Alligator Rescue on the Border

The alligator was trapped and destined to die a slow death: time for a rescue operation. An unexpected twist at one of the most biodiverse nature reserves in the United States, the National Butterfly Center in Mission, Texas.

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Review: Cristina Eisenberg’s The Carnivore Way

Can we really expect a growing population to live alongside large predators? Don’t we have a hard enough time with less dangerous critters? Cristina Eisenberg looks at the science, and lays out a blueprint for coexistence between people and predators in her new book, The Carnivore Way.

Posted In: Book Review
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Forest Dilemmas

Too many deer. Logging one tree to save another. Beavers versus old growth. Welcome to forest conservation in the Anthropocene. Beginning Monday, July 21, join us for a provocative 5-part series exploring the full complexity facing forest conservation in the eastern United States.

What is Cool Green Science?

noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

Cool Green Science is managed by Matt Miller, the Conservancy's deputy director for science communications, and edited by Bob Lalasz, its director of science communications. Email us your feedback.

Innovative Science

Investing in Seagrass
Marine scientists and fishers alike know that grass beds are valuable as nursery habitat. A new Conservancy-funded study puts a number to it.

Drones Aid Bird Conservation
How can California conservationists accurately count thousands of cranes? Enter a new tool in bird monitoring: the drone.

Creating a Climate-Smart Agriculture
Can farmers globally both adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change? A new paper answers with a definitive yes. But it won't be easy.

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