Marty Downs

Marty joined the Nature Conservancy in January 2014 to write about TNC research and manage the Science Impact Project. She started her career in ecosystem ecology and climate impact research, but has focused on science communications since 1999. She’s now doing what she likes best – writing about cool science and helping scientists find and communicate what’s exciting about their work.


Marty's Posts

Seeds on Loan, Solar Windows & At-Risk (and Way Cool) Birds

Also in our best of the web: NOAA nods to saltwater sport fishers, springtime rattlesnake confab, golf courses for conservation, and a bit more TED-tweaking.

Posted In: The Cooler
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Island Biogeography Theory Misses Mark for Tropical Forest Remnants

Species losses due to habitat fragmentation may be less bleak than predicted under the island biogeography theory, says a study of bat biodiversity in Costa Rica and Panama.

Posted In: Science
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Plant Zombies, Cannibal Tadpoles & the Fading Tuatara

Also in our best of the web: punk frogs, sea serpents on video, sadistic trolls (really), Masai fencing innovation, and Peter Matthiessen remembered

Posted In: The Cooler
Full Article

Zebra Stripes, Disease-Fighting Owls, and Jellyfish for Lunch

Also in our best of the web: rattlesnake wrangling, high-end environment news, art meets climate science, and an endangered mammal that looks like an artichoke

Posted In: The Cooler
Full Article

Of Crows and Cuckoos, Pigeons, Pachyderms, and Komodos

Also in our best of the web: A bioblitz near you, the Colorado delta gets a big gulp, never-till farming, and what Hollywood gets wrong about bugs and birders

Posted In: The Cooler
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Amphibian Invisibility Cloak, Resilient Bats, and Terror Birds

Also in our best of the web: taxonomy appreciation day, donor-funded science, rainwater harvesting, and snowy owls.

Posted In: The Cooler
Full Article

Definition as Intention: “Climate Adaptation”

A broad strokes definition of “climate adaptation” is enough to get resource managers talking and thinking. But getting to action may require more specifics.

Posted In: Quick Study
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Antarctic Invaders, Fungal Wonders and Birds Galore

Also in our best of the web: rock snot, turkey invasion, the Jynx bird, an underground ocean, TED talks back, and what Cosmos got wrong.

Posted In: The Cooler
Full Article

Investing in Seagrass Can Yield Big Returns, But It Requires Patience

Marine scientists and fishers alike know that grass beds are valuable as nursery habitat. A new Conservancy-funded study puts a number to it (and a pretty one).

Posted In: Science
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Loggerheads’ Lost Years, Bronx River Beavers & Sibley 2.0

Also in this week’s best of the web: blue-blooded horseshoe crabs, Javan rhinos, hitchhiking pseudoscorpions, and cave-dwelling crocodiles of Gabon

Posted In: The Cooler
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Elephants and Water Opossums and Wildebeests, Oh My

Also in our best of the web: how wind turbines might quiet hurricanes, real-time tracking of deforestation, and biocontrol for quagga mussels in Lake Powell.

Posted In: The Cooler
Full Article

The Adaptable Ptarmigan, Duckweed in Your Gas Tank & Much More

Also in our best of the web: transgenic chestnuts fights back, conservationists take a cue from Wiki-leaks, rats rule the Earth, and protein moves to the roof.

Posted In: The Cooler
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Oil from Grocery Bags, Elephant Repellent, Roadkill and More

Also in our best of the web: dating advice for spiders, big data for farming and disease prediction, and a little Darwin Day buzz.

Posted In: The Cooler
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Seeing the Trees – Without Losing Sight of the Forest

Lower resolution satellite images may be OK for global land cover, but for patchy, human-dominated landscapes, higher resolution matters–a lot.

Posted In: Quick Study
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Shrinking Fish, High Flying Bumblebees, Speeding Glaciers & More

Also in our weekly best of the web: the decline of natural history, the science of risk perception, and where the US is getting dirty with energy now.

Posted In: The Cooler
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