Centenarian Cetacean, Polar Bear Evolution & Superpolluting Scooters

Polar bears have evolved   amazing survival mechanisms. They handle long frigid winters with no fresh water and a super high fat diet.  Photo Credit: ©Robert M. Griffith

Polar bears have evolved amazing survival mechanisms. They handle long frigid winters with no fresh water and a super high fat diet. Wish people could too? Photo Credit: ©Robert M. Griffith

By Marty Downs, Bob Lalasz, Matt Miller, Lisa Feldkamp and Cara Byington of the TNC Science Communications team

We find tons of cool conservation and conservation science stuff on the Internets — and share the best of it with you every week in The Cooler:

Biodiversity & Wildlife

 

New Research

 

Climate Change

  •  Point of no return? Two new studies find the West Antarctic ice is in slow — and unstoppable — melt. (Mongabay)
  • If your imagination wasn’t vivid enough, Climate Central has pictures of what 12 feet of sea level rise would look like. (Climate Central)
  • A novelist, a paleoclimatologist and an astrobiologist walk into a rising ocean…three long views on rising sea levels. (DotEarth)
  • Head for the equator: Average latitude of maximum tropical storm intensity has shifted dramatically toward the poles. (Nature)

 

Nature News

  •  A nice memorial to Wendy Glenn, Malpais Borderlands Group co-founder, rancher, and Nature Conservancy partner and friend. (Stephen Bodio’s Querencia)
  • The White House residence gets a solar facelift. (Washington Post)

 

Conservation Tactics

 

Science Communications

 

This & That

 


Have suggestions for next week’s Cooler? Send them to mdowns[at]tnc.org.  Opinions expressed on Cool Green Science and in any corresponding comments are the personal opinions of the original authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of The Nature Conservancy.

Posted In: The Cooler

Marty joined the Nature Conservancy in January 2014 to write about TNC research and manage the Science Impact Project. She started her career in ecosystem ecology and climate impact research, but has focused on science communications since 1999. She’s now doing what she likes best – writing about cool science and helping scientists find and communicate what’s exciting about their work.



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noun 1. Blog where Nature Conservancy scientists, science writers and external experts discuss and debate how conservation can meet the challenges of a 9 billion + planet.

2. Blog with astonishing photos, videos and dispatches of Nature Conservancy science in the field.

3. Home of Weird Nature, The Cooler, Quick Study, Traveling Naturalist and other amazing features.

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