Aerial photogaph showing a gas well site (pad) in front of a new wind farm being constructed on a ridge above the Marcellus Shale formation in north-eastern Pennsylvania. With new technology, energy companies are now able to extract natural gas from Marce

February 19, 2014

Meeting energy development needs will require that we convert land from current uses. Photo: Mark Godfrey/TNC

(ALL RIGHTS, ALL USES) Aerial photogaph showing a gas well site (pad) in front of a new wind farm being constructed on a ridge above the Marcellus Shale formation in north-eastern Pennsylvania. With new technology, energy companies are now able to extract natural gas from Marcellus shale, a layer of black rock that runs beneath Pennsylvania, Ohio, Virginia, West Virginia and New York. The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania now has about 1,000 shale well sites or pads — each carving up close to 30 acres of forest between roads, pipelines, and infrastructure — but more than 60,000 wells (on 6,000 to 15,000 pads depending on density) could be dispersed over fields and forests by 2030. PHOTO CREDIT: Mark Godfrey © The Nature Conservancy

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