Peter Kareiva on How Nature Can Protect Us from Coastal Risk: An Interview

Peter Karevia, chief scientist of The Nature Conservancy, has just given an interview to New York public television stations WNET and WLIW’s Metrofocus program on the importance of natural habitats in reducing risk to U.S. coastal populations from storms. Watch it in the player above.

The interview was prompted by a new study in the journal Nature Climate Change that Kareiva and scientists at the Natural Capital Project coauthored. Money quote from Kareiva about the study:

“All previous studies have been after the fact. We’re giving [policymakers and citizens] information before the next storm and saying: New York, Florida, California, there’s a lot nature can do for you. Look closely and you can see it. Instead of chasing the ambulance, let’s get ahead of the game and get this information to planners before the next storm hits.”

Read Channel 13′s story on the interview.

Opinions expressed on Cool Green Science and in any corresponding comments are the personal opinions of the original authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of The Nature Conservancy.

Bob Lalasz is the director of science communications at The Nature Conservancy and the editor of the new Cool Green Science. A long-time editor and writer, he was previously the Conservancy's associate director of digital marketing. He now blogs here about the Conservancy's scientific research and on-the-ground work as well as larger conservation science and science communications issues.



Comments: Peter Kareiva on How Nature Can Protect Us from Coastal Risk: An Interview

  • CUBIC ACRES OF STYROFOAM GO IN LANDFILL EVERY DAY AND OUT TO SEA. MY MACHINE RECYCLES AND MAKES INTO FLOATING CONCRETE BLOCKS 36,000 LB COMP STRENGTH. SEE KNDO: RANCE DEWITT U-TUBE. YOU CAN BORROW THE MACHINE IF YOU ARE IN SEATTLE.

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