2014 NatureNet Fellowships: A Call for Conservation Scientists

conservation scientist

Conservation scientist Judy Haner taking GPS data in Mobile Bay, Alabama. Photo by Ami Vitale.

The Nature Conservancy is soliciting applications for its 2014 NatureNet Science Fellowships.

The fellowship program is a set of new interdisciplinary conservation science postdoctoral fellowships. We seek outstanding early-career scientists to improve and expand their research skills while directing their efforts towards problems at the interface of conservation, business and technology. The program is run in partnership with the following universities: Columbia, Cornell, Princeton, Stanford, the University of Pennsylvania and Yale.

Meet our 2013 fellows!

NatureNet fellows will be tackling the conservation challenges of today. The world faces unprecedented demands for food, water and energy — how can we meet these demands without exacerbating climate change and degrading natural systems? To tackle these new challenges, we need scientists that can blend economics, business, engineering, technology and communications with conservation and ecology.

Selected fellows will work with mentors based at their chosen university and at the Conservancy to develop a research program. The research programs will include both important basic research as well as science that addresses urgent challenges for conservation and that can be translated into or used immediately to guide action and policy. The joint mentorship provided by academia and the Conservancy will help fellows to implement this nexus of basic and pragmatic.

Applications must be submitted by October 10, 2013. Accepted candidates will be notified by January 15, 2014. To be eligible, candidates must have completed their doctorate within the past five years. Applicants who have not yet completed their doctorate must clearly indicate on the application the date the degree is expected.

Find out more about the NatureNet Science Fellowship and how to apply for it.

Posted In: Science

Darci Palmquist is a senior science writer for The Nature Conservancy. Previously she served as editorial manager for nature.org, the website of The Nature Conservancy, as well as for the Conservancy's e-newsletter. She is based in Amherst, Massachusetts.




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