Tag: migratory birds

Creating a Bird-Friendly Backyard

Written by | March 25th, 2014

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Spring migration is in the air. What can you do to make your own backyard accommodating for these frequent flyers? The Conservancy’s Dave Mehlman offers some easy tips to make your own backyard attractive to spring migrants.

Operation Osprey Banding

Written by | August 12th, 2013

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Don your hip waders and join our New Jersey staff as they navigate thick marsh and even thicker swarms of flies into raptor territory for an incredible osprey banding experience.

How to Create a Bird-Friendly Backyard

Written by | May 7th, 2013

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It’s that time of year when winged travelers everywhere are making their spring migrations. So bird nerds want to know: What can we do to make our own backyards accommodating for these frequent flyers?

To Catch a Willet

Written by | August 8th, 2012

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New technology is transforming the study of migratory birds. The challenge? Scientists need to tag birds, then re-catch them in order to retrieve the data.

Secrets of Willet Migration Revealed

Written by | August 7th, 2012

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A 3-year research project has discovered where eastern willets spend the winter–and how those wintering grounds might harbor threats to their survival.

Cool Green Morning: Wednesday, January 11

Written by | January 11th, 2012

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Climate change: great for anchovy populations, not so great for the rest of us.

  1. Anchovies are making a North Sea comeback. Thanks, climate change? (Conservation Mag)
  2. Some rare good news for rhinos– none were poached in Nepal last year! (Mongabay)
  3. The “doomsday clock” jumped a minute forward. Why? Climate change. (CleanTechnica)
  4. President Obama visited EPA staff to let them know he still cares. (Green)
  5. Oil rigs could possibly be responsible for turning migratory land-based birds into shark snacks. (Wired)

Cool Green Morning: Wednesday, April 7

Written by | April 7th, 2010

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The latest in green news, from laundry detergent to dragons… Today’s Cool Green Morning is certainly not lacking in variety:

  1. Researchers discovered a new species– a fruit-eating dragon– in a highly populated, deforested area in the Philippines. (Mongabay)
  2. A new trend in going green: giving up traditional laundry and dish-washing detergent. (Christian Science Monitor)
  3. Why closing state parks isn’t the answer to a budget crisis. (The Daily Green)
  4. Migratory birds adapt to climate change by sticking closer to home. (Wired)
  5. A new report finds that U.S. streams and rivers are getting a lot warmer. (YaleE360)

Photo of the Week: Southward-Bound Sanderling

Written by | October 30th, 2009

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It’s that time of year when birds start thinking of heading south for the winter (and New Englanders like me wistfully dream about it). Enjoy this great 3-in-1 shot — bird, reflection and shadow – of a sanderling at the beach in Virginia by Flickr user Dave W. Check out all The Nature Conservancy’s featured daily nature […]

Cool Green Morning: Thursday, October 29

Written by | October 29th, 2009

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Does a “green” job make you an environmentalist? Will the world come forward and pay Ecuador not to drill for oil in the Amazon? And how do birds know where to migrate to anyway? We don’t promise all these questions will be answered, but we do guarantee you’ll get the hottest green news links around, or […]

Breeding Is a Bust for Our Whimbrels

Written by | July 21st, 2009

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A few weeks ago, Cool Green Science started following the progress of five whimbrels on their flights north to breeding grounds in central Canada. One female shorebird, Hope, amazed us all when she changed her flight direction and touched down in northwest Canada. But now we have some disappointing news to share. Due to a […]

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