Tag: Matt Miller

Hunters, Anglers and Climate Change

Written by | July 14th, 2009

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Can hunters and anglers make a difference for climate change? After all, sportsmen and sportswomen have a long history of solving conservation challenges. Hunters — and I am one — take justifiable pride in their role in purchasing national wildlife refuges, restoring wildlife populations and conserving wetlands and other habitat. And they have a history of getting […]

Studying Wildlife to Death?

Written by | July 8th, 2009

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Are conservationists studying some wildlife to death? Writer Cat Urbigkit ponders the question in an interesting post on the Querencia blog about impacts of radio collars on bison and other animals. She includes pictures of collars rubbing animals’ necks raw, and wonders: Is all this really necessary? Noting the intrusive nature of collars, Urbigkit writes: “I […]

How ‘Green’ Is Your Lawn?

Written by | June 10th, 2009

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It’s true: A green lawn is not often a green lawn. Many of you already  know this, but neighborhood peer pressure keeps you reaching for weed spray, fertilizer and a lawnmower. When you step through your front door, do you feel like you’ve landed on the set of American Beauty? Do you worry that your attempts […]

Leave It (Mostly) To Beaver

Written by | May 27th, 2009

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In John Crowley’s science fiction novel Beasts, humans decide they’ve inflicted enough damage on the Earth, and utilize their technology to construct a giant tower removed from the rest of the world. They achieve self sufficiency in food and energy production, and thus no longer interact or inflict damage on the rest of the world. […]

Raise an Organic Toast to Earth Day

Written by | April 21st, 2009

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Looking for a proper beverage to enjoy (responsibly, of course) on Earth Day? How about an organic beer? I’ve recently been doing some “research” around town in Boise, and have found organic brews to be surprisingly easy to find. Not to mention tasty. There are organic lagers and ambers and India Pale Ales and porters, […]

Cuy: It’s What’s For Dinner

Written by | March 31st, 2009

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Visit an Andean village, and you have a decent chance of seeing a few cuy — also known as guinea pigs — running around homes. These aren’t pets. If you stick around that village, you may very well be served one for dinner. Cuy is a dish served in many parts of the Andes on […]

Born To Rewild

Written by | March 3rd, 2009

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North America is a land shaped by elephants. (And pronghorns like the one above — but more on that later.) 10,000 years ago — a blink of the evolutionary eye — members of the elephant family like mammoths and mastodons roamed our grasslands, influencing nearly every plant and animal that lived there. They were part […]

Seeing Red Over Salmon

Written by | February 10th, 2009

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Soon after I moved to Idaho, I fished a tiny little stream — the kind of water where you can catch trout of eight or maybe 10 inches. And then a behemoth swam by, literally parting the waters. A salmon. Half out of the water, it pushed on: the final part of a 900-mile journey to […]

The Falconer

Written by | January 27th, 2009

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If you ask me to identify the most effective conservationists around, I’ll answer without hesitation: Falconers. Falconers? Those fixtures of Renaissance fairs and Saturday Night Live skits? No, not them. The falconers I’m referring to form a serious, obsessive subculture who train raptors to hunt various game. Falconry takes anywhere from two to seven years to […]

Bears and Bed Stands

Written by | January 14th, 2009

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How did I find myself in this recent condition — the Franken-scar, the bloody wound, the watermelon-sized head? Did I meet the grizzly bear my mother warned me about? It was, alas, nothing so dramatic. In short: I fought the wall, and the wall won. My mom did warn me about the grizzlies, though. I […]

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