Tag: marine life

The Green Buzz: Tuesday, August 27

Written by | August 27th, 2013

 (0)

Today’s green news round-up reveals an interesting idea for naming hurricanes…

  1. In California, saving this species also means saving seagrass. (BBC)
  2. What if Hurricanes were named after climate change deniers? (Mongabay)
  3. Must see: NASA image reveals how large the devastating Rim Fire really is. (Science World Report)
  4. In the face of ocean acidification, some marine life adapts. (PhysOrg)
  5. Say goodbye to satellites and hello to giant solar-powered planes. (TreeHugger)

The Green Buzz: Friday, March 29

Written by | March 29th, 2013

 (0)

Before you start your weekend, here are 5 must-read green news stories.

  1. Africa fairy circles explained… and all circles point towards termites. (NY Times)
  2. Hope comes in the form of a footprint: Sumatran rhino may be alive on Indonesia’s Borneo island. (Washington Post)
  3. A new poll reveals 82% of U.S. adults believe climate change is already occurring. (Nature)
  4. In cool animal news, check out the sticky way a sea hare fools predators. (BBC Nature)
  5. A robot jellyfish could be the future of Navy underwater surveillance. (Wired)

Cool Green Morning: Friday, November 16

Written by | November 16th, 2012

 (0)

We’re setting world records with today’s green news.

  1. A third of marine species are still unknown to science. (Mail Online)
  2. One man brings solar power to a dark New York city post-Sandy. (Forbes)
  3. Hermann tortoise, you are NOT the father! Tortoise paternity tests reveal interesting findings. (BBC Nature)
  4. What animal holds the world record for the most legs at 750? (Huffington Post Green)
  5. Anti-rat campaign is in full effect on the Galapagos islands. (MNN)

Clearing the Murky Waters: Where Are we Headed with Oyster Restoration?

Written by | October 11th, 2012

 (5)

The catastrophic declines in oyster abundance across the U.S. are well documented. So how much restoration is necessary before oysters once more benefit our coastal waters on a large scale?

Saving the Shark that Bit Me: Back to Work

Written by | August 16th, 2012

 (0)

Our marine biologist doesn’t let a shark bite come between him and his work at one of the most biologically diverse locations in the world.

Seeing the Oysters for the Reefs

Written by | June 13th, 2012

 (0)

Since a single oyster can filter up to 30 gallons of water every day, clearing and cleaning it for the benefit of other marine life, just imagine what restoring billions might do for your favorite coastal bay.

Cool Green Morning: Thursday, January 5

Written by | January 5th, 2012

 (0)

They say imitation is the highest form of flattery.

  1. Meet a fish that mimics an octopus… that mimics fish. (msnbc)
  2. Parasite flies are turning honeybees into “zom-bees.” (Time)
  3. Here’s a bright idea: solar-powered ATMs bring money to rural India. (TreeHugger)
  4. Harp seal pups are on thin ice. (Green)
  5. Seattle thinks outside the tray and serves students healthier school lunches. (Grist)

Cool Green Morning: Tuesday, January 3

Written by | January 3rd, 2012

 (0)

Happy New Year, greenies!

  1. World’s first hybrid shark found in Australia’s waters. (Discovery News)
  2. Hehe. Scientists are tickling animals to learn how laughter has evolved. (BBC)
  3. China’s city dwellers will be breathing unhealthy air for at least another 20 years. (Guardian)
  4. African elephant ivory trade sadly rises in 2011. (Green)
  5. Ecuador makes a deal and raises $116 million to not drill in the Amazon. (Mongabay)

Cool Green Morning: Tuesday, December 13

Written by | December 13th, 2011

 (0)

Walking fish puts a chink in the evolution chain.

  1. New species of frog sings like a… bird? (Mongabay)
  2. The lungfish suggests walking originated underwater. (Science World)
  3. Scientists are learning how to kill trees — in the name of science, of course. (Green)
  4. 16% of the species in “Finding Nemo” face the threat of extinction. (Washington Post)
  5. Solar energy gives students in developing countries access to technology. (TreeHugger)

Sharks Hold Key to Healthy Marine Systems

Written by | May 6th, 2011

 (0)

Mark Tercek, our president and CEO, went scuba diving off the Palmyra Atoll and was surrounded by a large number of sharks. See the video and find out why that’s a very good thing.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...



About Conservancy Talk

We're green. We're nature-lovers. We are Conservancy Talk. Hear Nature Conservancy staff and invited experts share their voices on today’s conservation issues — in our uniquely rigorous, science-based way. Learn more

Latest Tweets from @nature_org