Tag: LiveScience

The Green Buzz: Tuesday, September 24

Written by | September 24th, 2013

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We’ve got some stinky green news this morning for ya. Hold your nose and read on!

  1. Do you smell that? 5 animals with impressively stinky defenses. (Nat Geo)
  2. Why CrossFit may be the greenest gym option out there. (TreeHugger)
  3. Brace yourself: thunder, hail and tornadoes may be on the way. (Grist)
  4. Age ain’t nothing but a number… but the moon is 100 million years younger than thought! (Space)
  5. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions could prevent up to 3 million premature deaths a year. (LiveScience)

The Green Buzz: Tuesday, August 6

Written by | August 6th, 2013

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In today’s green news, we learn that New Zealand doesn’t quite live up to its “100% Pure” slogan.

  1. Dairy scare dings New Zealand’s environmental credentials. (Reuters)
  2. Heart break: the polar bear who died of climate change. (The Guardian)
  3. Meet the most exquisitely weird spiders you’ve ever seen. (Wired Science)
  4. Who wants a bite of the lab-grown hamburger? Mmmm… (Bloomberg)
  5. Six unexpected effects of climate change. (LiveScience)

The Green Buzz: Tuesday, June 25

Written by | June 25th, 2013

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In today’s green news: are plants smarter than humans?

  1. The case of the missing red panda: closed. Phew! (USA Today)
  2. Plants flex their math skills at night to control their food supplies. (Discovery News)
  3. Superstorms bring power outages — and another reason to design better insulated buildings. (TreeHugger)
  4. 61 years of searching and hoping, researcher photographs an endangered right whale in Canada. (LiveScience)
  5. See Sunday’s Supermoon in a series of super images. (National Geographic)

The Green Buzz: Tuesday, April 23

Written by | April 23rd, 2013

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Here are today’s top green news headlines. And remember: everyday can be Earth Day!

  1. How did you celebrate Earth Day? We’re loving Grist’s photo round-up. (Grist)
  2. Facebook plans to cover it’s 400,000+ square foot roof in trees. (The Atlantic Wire)
  3. How cloned redwoods can help combat climate change. (LiveScience)
  4. Americans less concerned about the environment than when Earth Day began. (Huffington Post Green)
  5. It’s getting hot out there: in 1400 years, the last 30 years were the warmest. (Mongabay)

Cool Green Morning: Thursday, January 24

Written by | January 24th, 2013

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In today’s green news we learn that an apple a day keeps landfill waste at bay.

  1. As much as 30% of fresh produce doesn’t make it off the farm. One grocery store aims to change that. (Grist)
  2. Salt Lake City gives Beijing a run for its money when it comes to air pollution. (Huffington Post Green)
  3. Fukushima radiation fears still haunt Japan… and us. (LiveScience)
  4. The good news: Greenland melting slows. The bad news: Antarctica doesn’t. (Nature)
  5. From the brink of extinction: elephant seals make a remarkable comeback. (Mongabay)

Cool Green Morning: Friday, January 18

Written by | January 18th, 2013

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Forget April showers, global warming brings early flowers.

  1. Gosh, animals are fascinating: Japanese quails demonstrate mastery of camouflage. (Scientific American)
  2. White nose syndrome has killed 5.5 million bats — now spreads to Kentucky. (Green)
  3. Thoreau helps scientists make connections between climate change and early spring flowers. (LiveScience)
  4. Speaking of, six ways climate change will affect you, yes YOU. (National Geographic)
  5. The Dept of Energy is offering a $10M prize to make solar installation cheaper. (Grist)

Cool Green Morning: Friday, January 11

Written by | January 11th, 2013

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In: cash for snakes. Out: plastic bottles. Yep, just another quirky green news roundup.

  1. Killing pythons for cash? Florida puts a bounty on the Burmese python. (Bloomberg)
  2. From dreadful heat in Brazil to flooding in Pakistan, an in-depth look at 2012′s extreme weather. (NY Times)
  3. Cheers! Concord, Mass becomes the first US city to ban plastic bottles. (TreeHugger)
  4. Innovative and eco-friendly: Dutch “smart highway” glows in the dark. (LiveScience)
  5. The Pacific bluefin tuna population has declined by 96%. (Discovery News)

Cool Green Morning: Friday, November 9

Written by | November 9th, 2012

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Imagine enjoying your Cool Green Morning without coffee. Scary but very possible…

  1. Fish “bodyguards” protect coral from seaweed attack. (LiveScience)
  2. Buzzkill. Climate change may put your cup of joe at risk. (National Geographic)
  3. When life gives you wood chips, make gasoline. (Green)
  4. Surfboards emit as much CO2 as cellphones and laptops. (TreeHugger)
  5. An ultralight aircraft guides a flock of whooping cranes on their migration route. (Huffington Post Green)

Cool Green Morning: Tuesday, October 23

Written by | October 23rd, 2012

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Green ice cream, poop jokes and talking whales — we’re having that kind of Cool Green Morning.

  1. Russian spacecraft has an unlikely crew: 32 fish hitch a ride to space. (MSNBC)
  2. Beluga whale mimics a human’s voice — we dare you to listen without smiling! (National Geographic)
  3. Beetles dance on poop balls (yes, poop) to stay cool. (LiveScience)
  4. Ben & Jerry’s ice cream becomes even greener with their new B corporation status. (TreeHugger)
  5. A whopping 1,209 elephant tusks confiscated from poachers. (Mongabay)

Cool Green Morning: Tuesday, October 9

Written by | October 9th, 2012

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We have quite an interesting assortment of gooey, green news today.

  1. What has two thumbs and is the cause of most whale deaths? (LiveScience)
  2. Scientists try turn seawater into jet fuel. (Gizmag)
  3. Did glowing fireworms help Columbus discover America? (Green)
  4. Slime mold has no brain but does have a memory. (National Geographic)
  5. 100-million-year-old spider attack recorded in amber. (Wired Science)
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