Tag: Fresh Water

Favorite Nature: Bryan Piazza on Coming to the Atchafalaya

Written by | April 7th, 2014

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How does a self-described Wisconsin boy come to love the Louisiana bayou? Blogger Cara Byington talks to Bryan Piazza, author of “The Atchafalaya River Basin.”

Colorado River: Hope for the Hopeless?

Written by | March 27th, 2014

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When Taylor Hawes first became director of the Conservancy’s Colorado River Program, people told her she was crazy. But is the Colorado River really a lost cause? As water flows today, Hawes sees hope for the hopeless.

H2.O: Announcing a New Platform for Water Activists

Written by | March 26th, 2014

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The critical water challenges we face require everyone to be involved. Introducing H2.O, a new digital platform to engage new audiences for the Conservancy’s freshwater work and to create an online community of water activists.

Cities Take Action on Climate and Nature

Written by | March 13th, 2014

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What are the challenges and solutions being used in cities to address water risks? A recent event bringing 300 leaders from more than 60 global cities offers a revealing snapshot, Conservancy blogger Adam Freed reports.

In an Increasingly Unpredictable World, We Must Secure Nature to Secure our Water

Written by | February 21st, 2014

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As a balmy Sochi Olympics wraps up, other parts of the world grapple with droughts and the “polar vortex.” What does this mean for our water supplies? In this reality, writes Dr. Giulio Boccaletti, the role of nature in securing a sustainable water future becomes critically important.

Scaling Up Water Sustainability

Written by | February 3rd, 2014

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As countries around the globe look to scale up water sustainability, Dr. Giulio Boccaletti argues that protecting natural infrastructure — lakes, aquifers and wetlands — is in many cases the most cost-effective option to provide clean water.

The Green Buzz: Tuesday, January 14

Written by | January 14th, 2014

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Emperor penguins are climbing cliffs to avoid climate change and forest elephants are making it rain in today’s #greennews.

  1. Four colonies of iconic emperor penguins were spotted climbing cliffs to avoid increasingly rampant ice melt. (Mother Nature Network
  2. Tropical forests play a large role in precipitation around the world and in Congo, they’re bolstered by the eating & excreting of the forest elephant. (BBC)
  3. A recent MIT study projects that 52% of the world’s population in 2050 will live in water-stressed areas. (Treehugger)

The Green Buzz: Tuesday, January 7

Written by | January 7th, 2014

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Science gets to the bottom of mysteries like widely reported “earthquake lights” and the true age of the cockroach in today’s green news.

1. While people for millenia have reported seeing mysterious lights immediately before earthquakes, scientists think they’ve found the answer in a unique reaction by stressed rocks. (National Geographic)

2. Researchers in northwest Colorado recently discovered 49-million-year-old fossilized cockroaches, pushing back the bug’s known Earth record by a full 5 million years. (Live Science)

3. California’s lack of snowfall this winter hurts more than avid skiers; it means people and nature in the state will have a lot less freshwater at their disposal. (Grist)

4. Windpower in the UK generated a record 10% of the country’s electricity in December, enough for 5.7 million homes during one of the most energy-intensive times of the year. (TreeHugger)

The Green Buzz: Friday, December 6

Written by | December 6th, 2013

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Porpoises in the Thames?! The British would say, “Were they here for bickies and tea?”

  1. Thinking about gifts for mom this holiday season? Impress her by going green. (Examiner)
  2. They found it! More fresh water sources under the sea…giving hopes to the Atlantis theorists (ENS)
  3. A pop of Porpoises were spotted in the river Thames in London! A sign the river’s health is improving. (Guardian)
  4. Take cover! Air pollution sends school children running for cover in Shanghai. (Guardian)
  5. Older countries care more about the environment? (Slate)

No Dream Too Big for China’s Mother River

Written by | December 3rd, 2013

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With colossal dams interrupting the Yangtze River, it’s easy to say the river is gone. But large rivers are more resilient than that and what we do now will be invaluable for the many rivers around the world facing their own uncertain futures.

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